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I've been trying to wrap my head around the readonly property and I could use some clarification on some code I wrote. Ive got a @property (nonatomic, readonly) BOOL test; in my header and I wrote this in my .m

-(BOOL)test{
    test = (a == b) && (b < c);
    return test;
}

if (self.test) {
    NSLog(@"a is less than c");
}
else {
    NSLog(@"a is equal or greater than c")
}

so I have a couple questions based on this. When I compile this it will already know what test is right? I don't have to write [self test] in the viewDidLoad or init right? Why in the if statement does it have to be self.test and not just test. In the test method can I return more then just the test? like can I return test and then write below it return test1 and then return test 2 if they're all BOOL's?

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closed as not a real question by Josh Caswell, Jav_Rock, Monolo, Clyde Lobo, Goyuix Sep 24 '12 at 14:21

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2 Answers 2

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When I compile this it will already know what test is right?

Well, the compiler will know you declared a property test.

I don't have to write [self test] in the viewDidLoad or init right?

No.

Why in the if statement does it have to be self.test and not just test?

It's because you declare a property test. To access the underlying ivar _test you must use the accessor for it, or access _test directly, assuming you have synthesized it, or you are using a version of Xcode capable of autosynthesize.

In the test method can I return more then just the test?

You can return anything you like in the getter method for test. By convention, of course, you would return the backing ivar for the property.

Like can I return test and then write[sic] below it return test1 and then return test 2 if they're all BOOL's?

No, the getter method needs to return the same type as the declared property.

I think you would do well to read up on declared properties, how they are used, and their relationship to instance variables.

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-(BOOL)test{
    test = (a == b) && (b < c);
    return test;
}

In this case test is just a local variable that is used to hold the value that you are calculating. It's not used outside of the function, and it doesn't matter what it is called. You could replace test with foo within the method and it will still work.

if (self.test) {
    NSLog(@"a is less than c");
}
else {
    NSLog(@"a is equal or greater than c")
}

In this case, you are calling self.test because test isn't a variable in your class, it's a property whose value is returned by a method. Which is why you call the property instead of just test because there is not test variable, just a property.

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Also you might want to clarify and talk about the fact that the asker is wondering if they can put three return statements in a row. Return will return you out of the method. That's why in a method that doesn't return anything (returns void) you can short circuit a complex logic block by simply typing return; since it'll pop you out of the context of the method immediately. –  Jack Lawrence Sep 23 '12 at 16:18

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