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I have this Java app that I'm doing some web scraping with using the JSoup library. I'm using the library and it's returning a collection of Strings 6 of them. I need to map these 6 random strings to properties on an object. I know which order the strings are coming in and what number maps to what property. I don't feel like my approach is the best way to handle this. It feels lose, readability sucks, and I'm just wondering if there's a better way to do this. I was thinking using enum's or something alone those lines. Long story short here's a code snippet. Thanks for any help.

List<String> strings = JSoup.getStrings();
Car car = new Car();
int i = 0;
for(String s : strings) {
    switch (i) {
        case 0:
            car.setMake(s);
            break;
        case 1:
            car.setModel(s);
            break;
        .....
    }
    i++;
}
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Uh, won't this code have an effect only twice? The third time i == 3, and you have no case statement or default to handle that. – Raghav Sood Sep 23 '12 at 16:12
    
Sorry! Edited. Imagine there are 4 more Case statements down there :) – Joe Goble Sep 23 '12 at 16:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since this question is about best practices, you should consider providing a constructor in Car that takes a List of Strings as an input. The constructor will then initialize the fields for the car from the List of Strings one by one because that's what constructors are for any way. This means that the code for populating your car instance will now be in a single place, i.e inside the Car class.

This approach will eliminate the need for the code that creates a Car instance to manually initialize the Car instance. No matter how many different classes create a Car, the initialization code will not be duplicated in each of these classes. Placing the initialization code inside car itself promotes reusability. Isn't that what classes are written for?

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How about simply

car.setMake(strings.get(0));
car.setModel(strings.get(1));
...

That looks quite readable and simple enough to me.

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I would write it as follows:

List<String> strings = JSoup.getStrings();
if (null == strings || strings.isEmpty() || MAX_SIZE != strings.size()) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("I don't know what you are talking about!");
}
Car car = new Car();
car.setMake(strings.get(0));
car.setModel(strings.get(1));
...

It is clear to the reader of the code that I expect only so many values in the list and each element is a specific attribute of the car. When a new attribute gets added, the exception will let the modifier know that he has to do something here to handle the new attribute.

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