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I have a set of functions that I use very often, so I would like to collect them in a library. Before I start writing the library, I was thinking about where to store the constants that influence the behavior of some of the functions.

What I would like to write when using the library was the following:

import tools
tools.collect(object_a, object_b, mode=tools.collect.RECURSIVE)

Generally speaking, the constants the function should be able to accept should be stored in the function itself.

In order to achieve this, I created a decorator function that assigns the passed attributes to the decorated function.

def attr_decorator(**attrs):
    def decorator(f):
        for k, v in attrs.iteritems():
            setattr(f, k, v)
        return f
    return decorator

This decorator could be used like this:

@attr_decorator(
    FLAT = 1 << 0,
    RECURSIVE 1 << 1,
)
def collect(a, b, mode):
    # ...

This works pretty fine so far.

But what about default arguments?

@attr_decorator(
    FLAT = 1 << 0,
    RECURSIVE 1 << 1,
)
def collect(a, b, mode=collect.RECURSIVE):
    # ...

This does not work, because the collect function is not defined (and therefore not even decorated) at the point the default-value for the mode argument is stored.

This does not look nice

The only solution I was able to come up with resulted in an awkward syntax and it just didn't look nice. I am giving the decorator-function the same attributes as the function that is going to be decorated.

def attr_decorator(**attrs):
    def decorator(f):
        for k, v in attrs.iteritems():
            setattr(f, k, v)
        return f

    for k, v in attrs.iteritems():
        setattr(decorator, k, v)

    return decorator

It doesn't take a genius to recognize that this is not nice to read:

collect_d = attr_decorator(
    FLAT = 1 << 0,
    RECURSIVE = 1 << 1,
)
@collect_d
def collect(root, callback, mode=collect_d.RECURSIVE):
    # ...

Question:

Can you think of a better approach? I would really like to stay with the "one-statement-to-decorate" thing.

share|improve this question
    
Two alternatives: 1) global constants, and 2) your decorator closely mirrors the operation of functools.partial, are you sure you're not reinventing the wheel? –  Joel Cornett Sep 23 '12 at 16:45
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2 Answers

You could use a special variable as a reference to the function being defined.

class Attr(object):
    def __init__(self, name): self.name = name

class Attributor(object):
    def __getattr__(self, x): return Attr(x)

_ = Attributor()

def attr_decorator(**attrs):
    def decorator(f):
        for k, v in attrs.iteritems():
            setattr(f, k, v)
        f.func_defaults = tuple(attrs[t.name] if isinstance(t, Attr) else t for t in f.func_defaults)
        return f
    return decorator    

@attr_decorator(
    FLAT = 1 << 0,
    RECURSIVE = 1 << 1,
)
def collect(a, b, mode=_.RECURSIVE, foo=123):
    print a, b, mode, foo

collect(100,200) # 100 200 2 123
share|improve this answer
    
Very smart, sir. That does indeed look like a good solution! +1 (But I'll wait for possible other answers) –  Niklas R Sep 23 '12 at 16:59
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Generally speaking, the constants the function should be able to accept should be stored in the function itself.

I disagree with that statement. These constants are part of the external interface to the function, meant to be used by the caller. What is wrong with defining them as part of tools?

COLLECT_RECURSIVE=0
COLLECT_NONRECURSIVE=1
COLLECT_OTHER=2

def collect(a,b,mode):
    pass

The caller:

import tools
tools.collect(object_a, object_b, mode=tools.COLLECT_RECURSIVE)
share|improve this answer
    
Well, it's my personal choice for storing constants for this library. ;) –  Niklas R Sep 23 '12 at 17:37
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