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Having empty Dictionary<int, string> how to fill it with keys and values from XML like

<items>
<item id='int_goes_here' value='string_goes_here'/>
</items>

and serialize it back into XML not using XElement?

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6  
It's helpful to explain why you don't want a particular solution (even if XElement is probably not the right way). –  codesparkle Sep 23 '12 at 16:50
    
Why don't you want to use XElement? Serialization/Deserialization could be done in one line with linq. –  L.B Sep 23 '12 at 19:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

With the help of a temporary item class

public class item
{
    [XmlAttribute]
    public int id;
    [XmlAttribute]
    public string value;
}

Sample Dictionary:

Dictionary<int, string> dict = new Dictionary<int, string>()
{
    {1,"one"}, {2,"two"}
};

.

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(item[]), 
                                 new XmlRootAttribute() { ElementName = "items" });

Serialization

serializer.Serialize(stream, 
              dict.Select(kv=>new item(){id = kv.Key,value=kv.Value}).ToArray() );

Deserialization

var orgDict = ((item[])serializer.Deserialize(stream))
               .ToDictionary(i => i.id, i => i.value);

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here is how it can be done using XElement, if you change your mind.

Serialization

XElement xElem = new XElement(
                    "items",
                    dict.Select(x => new XElement("item",new XAttribute("id", x.Key),new XAttribute("value", x.Value)))
                 );
var xml = xElem.ToString(); //xElem.Save(...);

Deserialization

XElement xElem2 = XElement.Parse(xml); //XElement.Load(...)
var newDict = xElem2.Descendants("item")
                    .ToDictionary(x => (int)x.Attribute("id"), x => (string)x.Attribute("value"));
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how to support XElement in unity3d? –  Ashwani K Feb 15 '13 at 11:40

Paul Welter's ASP.NET blog has a dictionary that is serializeable. But it does not use attributes. I will explain why below the code.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

[XmlRoot("dictionary")]
public class SerializableDictionary<TKey, TValue>
    : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, IXmlSerializable
{
    #region IXmlSerializable Members
    public System.Xml.Schema.XmlSchema GetSchema()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void ReadXml(System.Xml.XmlReader reader)
    {
        XmlSerializer keySerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TKey));
        XmlSerializer valueSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TValue));

        bool wasEmpty = reader.IsEmptyElement;
        reader.Read();

        if (wasEmpty)
            return;

        while (reader.NodeType != System.Xml.XmlNodeType.EndElement)
        {
            reader.ReadStartElement("item");

            reader.ReadStartElement("key");
            TKey key = (TKey)keySerializer.Deserialize(reader);
            reader.ReadEndElement();

            reader.ReadStartElement("value");
            TValue value = (TValue)valueSerializer.Deserialize(reader);
            reader.ReadEndElement();

            this.Add(key, value);

            reader.ReadEndElement();
            reader.MoveToContent();
        }
        reader.ReadEndElement();
    }

    public void WriteXml(System.Xml.XmlWriter writer)
    {
        XmlSerializer keySerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TKey));
        XmlSerializer valueSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TValue));

        foreach (TKey key in this.Keys)
        {
            writer.WriteStartElement("item");

            writer.WriteStartElement("key");
            keySerializer.Serialize(writer, key);
            writer.WriteEndElement();

            writer.WriteStartElement("value");
            TValue value = this[key];
            valueSerializer.Serialize(writer, value);
            writer.WriteEndElement();

            writer.WriteEndElement();
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

First, there is one gotcha with this code. Say you read a dictionary from another source that has this:

<dictionary>
  <item>
    <key>
      <string>key1</string>
    </key>
    <value>
      <string>value1</string>
    </value>
  </item>
  <item>
    <key>
      <string>key1</string>
    </key>
    <value>
      <string>value2</string>
    </value>
  </item>
</dictionary>

This will throw a exception on de-seariazation because you can only have one key for a dictionary.


The reason you MUST use a XElement in a seriazed dictionary is dictionary is not defined as Dictionary<String,String>, a dictionary is Dictionary<TKey,TValue>.

To see the problem, ask your self: Lets say we have a TValue that serializes in to something that uses Elements it describes itself as XML (lets say a dictionary of dictionaries Dictionary<int,Dictionary<int,string>> (not that uncommon of a pattern, it's a lookup table)), how would your Attribute only version represent a dictionary entirely inside a attribute?

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Dictionaries are not Serializable in C# by default, I don't know why, but it seems to have been a design choice.

Right now, I'd recommend using Json.NET to convert it to JSON and from there into a dictionary (and vice versa). Unless you really need the XML, I'd recommend using JSON completely.

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2  
As far as I understood, he wants to de-/serialize XML to a dictionary. If Dictionary were serializable, you could use built-in classes like XmlSerializer for the task, but as I said, it isn't. –  manuFS Sep 23 '12 at 17:34
    
OK then I probably misunderstood. Deleting comment. –  Blam Sep 23 '12 at 17:57

Write a class A, that contains of an array of class B. Class B should have an id property and a value property. Deserialize the xml to class A. Convert the array in A to the wanted dictionary.

To serialize the dictionary convert it to an instance of class A, and serialize...

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    /// <summary>
    /// Serializes object to xml file
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="data"></param>
    /// <param name="filePath"></param>
    public static void SerializeToXML(object data, string filePath)
    {
        System.IO.Stream stream = null;
        try
        {
            stream = System.IO.File.Open(filePath, System.IO.FileMode.Create);
            System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer x = new System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer(data.GetType());
            x.Serialize(stream, data);
            stream.Close();
            stream.Dispose();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            try
            {
                stream.Close();
                stream.Dispose();
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
            }
            throw new Exception(ex.Message);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Deserializes xml file to object
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="filePath"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static object DeSerializeFromXML(string filePath, Type type)
    {
        object data = null;
        System.IO.Stream stream = null;
        try
        {
            stream = System.IO.File.Open(filePath, System.IO.FileMode.Open);
            System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer x = new System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer(type);
            //data = x.Deserialize(stream);
            data = x.Deserialize(new System.Xml.XmlTextReader(stream));
            stream.Close();
            stream.Dispose();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            try
            {
                stream.Close();
                stream.Dispose();
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
            }
            throw new Exception(ex.Message);
        }
        return data;
    }
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Object passed to SerializeToXML must be marked as serializable (if you are gonna use custom class). –  Gregor Primar Sep 23 '12 at 18:38
    
Well you can serialize it to custom class (as I have mentioned before). Write function inside this class that returns Dictionary representation and you are done. –  Gregor Primar Sep 23 '12 at 18:47
    
And even though it is marked Seriazable on the MSDN you get the following error when you try to serialize it The type System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary'2[[System.String, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089],[System.String, mscorlib, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089]] is not supported because it implements IDictionary. –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 23 '12 at 18:47

I use serializable classes for the WCF communication between different modules. Below is an example of serializable class which serves as DataContract as well. My approach is to use the power of LINQ to convert the Dictionary into out-of-the-box serializable List<> of KeyValuePair<>:

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Runtime.Serialization;
    using System.Xml.Serialization;

    namespace MyFirm.Common.Data
    {
        [DataContract]
        [Serializable]
        public class SerializableClassX
        {
            // since the Dictionary<> class is not serializable,
            // we convert it to the List<KeyValuePair<>>
            [XmlIgnore]
            public Dictionary<string, int> DictionaryX 
            {
                get
                {
                    return  SerializableList == null ? 
                            null :
                            SerializableList.ToDictionary(item => item.Key, item => item.Value);
                }

                set
                {
                    SerializableList =  value == null ?
                                        null :
                                        value.ToList();
                }
            }

            [DataMember]
            [XmlArray("SerializableList")]
            [XmlArrayItem("Pair")]
            public List<KeyValuePair<string, int>> SerializableList { get; set; }
        }
    }

The usage is straightforward - I assign a dictionary to my data object's dictionary field - DictionaryX. The serialization is supported inside the SerializableClassX by conversion of the assigned dictionary into the serializable List<> of KeyValuePair<>:

    // create my data object
    SerializableClassX SerializableObj = new SerializableClassX(param);

    // this will call the DictionaryX.set and convert the '
    // new Dictionary into SerializableList
    SerializableObj.DictionaryX = new Dictionary<string, int>
    {
        {"Key1", 1},
        {"Key2", 2},
    };
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