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import java.util.Scanner;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter Code");

        String code = input.next();
    }

    public static boolean isValidCode (String code) {

    }
}

I'm having a lot of trouble in java when I try to make restrictions on input. In this example, I need the string code to only accept symbols such as $ and %. How can I check to make sure there are no numbers,letters, or other symbols? Thanks

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2  
You can use regular expressions. –  maba Sep 23 '12 at 16:52
    
@maba: You should post that as an answer! But you might want to give a Java-specific link as well, such as download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/regex/…. –  ruakh Sep 23 '12 at 16:57
    
I see regular expressions for numbers and letters but not this specific. –  Tooilia Sep 23 '12 at 16:57
3  
@ruakh There's gonna be tons of answers for this question. People are so eager to earn some reps so they will easily go for this one. It's like when you see a question about String comparison. Ten answers immediately. –  maba Sep 23 '12 at 17:00
    
@Tooilia: You'll have to create your own "character class". Like "[%$&_]" –  Fildor Sep 23 '12 at 17:02

4 Answers 4

This should work to invalidate strings that contain anything except $ and/or %:

public static boolean isValidCode (String code) {
    return code.matches("^[$%]*$");
}

If you also require that the string not be empty, then change the * to a +. If you need to accept other characters, just add them to the character class list (the characters between the square brackets).

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+1 That's how I'd do it. –  Fildor Sep 23 '12 at 17:11
public static boolean isValidCode(String code) {
    return code.matches("[$%]*");
}

As you can see in regex javadoc, the angle brackets say that you can choose between the enclosing characters ($ and % in your case); * say that it must appear 0 or more times.

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You might want to put "s around that regex. –  Luke Woodward Sep 23 '12 at 17:04
    
No, * says that it can appear 0 or more times, you are thinking of +. –  Keppil Sep 23 '12 at 17:04
    
* is 0 or more , just saying –  Fildor Sep 23 '12 at 17:04
    
Even if you change the * to +, that will match any string that has at least one of $ or %. You need anchors at each end. –  Ted Hopp Sep 23 '12 at 17:04
    
Ted's right. I would negate it, though. Like "if the string is being matched containing one character NOT in the class then it is NOT valid". Should be easier. At least that's what I understood the op wants. –  Fildor Sep 23 '12 at 17:08

Use Character Class.

Here is the Code for you :

public class Hello {




    public static void main(String[] args) {


    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Enter Code");

     String code = input.next();
     char c = code.charAt(0);
    if( (!Character.isDigit(c)) && (!Character.isLetter(c) && (!Character.isWhitespace(c)))){

        if(c == '%' || c=='$'){

            System.out.println("Its what u want");
        }else{
            System.out.println("Not what u want");
        }
    }else{
        System.out.println("Not what u want$");
    }


     }



}
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1  
Yeesh--no! This is a job for regular expression matching, not do-it-yourself validation. –  Ted Hopp Sep 23 '12 at 17:06
    
@TedHopp did OP mentioned that this has to be strictly done using Regex. Every programmer won't think the same.... we all have our own ways to solve a problem..... So please don't be judgmental about what should be used and what should not be... let the OP select which best suits his or her needs... thanks –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Sep 23 '12 at 17:08
    
If OP asks for a solution using Regex, then why post an answer that does not use Regex? –  Ted Hopp Sep 23 '12 at 17:10
1  
Yes, you're right that Regex is not required. Nevertheless, a single Regex match is much clearer than half a dozen lines of logic. Besides, your answer only is correct for strings of length 1. It will incorrectly approve of multi-character strings that start with $ or %, and it will throw an exception with empty strings. –  Ted Hopp Sep 23 '12 at 17:15
2  
Please read the docs for Scanner.next(). It returns the next token (as determined by the current delimiters--defaulting to whitespace characters), not the next character. –  Ted Hopp Sep 23 '12 at 17:24
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Test 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter Code");

        String code = input.next();
        for(int i=0;i<code.length();i++)
        {
            char c = code.charAt(i);

            if((!Character.isDigit(c))&&(!Character.isLetter(c)&&(!Character.isWhitespace(c))))      
            {
                if(c=='%'||c=='$')
                {
                    //What U Want..........
                }
                else
                {
                    System.out.println("Plz! Enter Only '%' or '$'");
                    break;
                }
            }//if
            else
            {
                System.out.println("Allows Only '%' or '$' Symbols");
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}
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