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I thought references only extend the lifetime of temporaries to the lifetime of the reference itself, but the output of the following snippet seems contradictory:

#include <iostream>

struct X{ ~X(){ std::cout << "Goodbye, cruel world!\n"; } };

X const& f(X const& x = X()){
  std::cout << "Inside f()\n";
  return x;
}

void g(X const& x){
  std::cout << "Inside g()\n";
}

int main(){
  g(f());
}

Live example. Output:

Inside f()
Inside g()
Goodbye, cruel world!

So it seems the temporary is destroyed after g() is called... what gives?

share|improve this question
    
It's normally considered unfriendly to not leave an explanation when downvoting. –  Xeo Sep 23 '12 at 18:54
    
My guess is the downvoter accidentally hit the downvote button when they actually meant to hit the upvote button (looking at the total votes for your answer and question also supports this theory). But who knows! –  Jesse Good Sep 23 '12 at 20:51
    
@Jesse: Nice theory, but the answer had more upvotes than the question before the downvote came in. :) –  Xeo Sep 23 '12 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The standard handles this in a special case in §12.2 [class.temporary]:

p4 There are two contexts in which temporaries are destroyed at a different point than the end of the full-expression. [...]

p5 The second context is when a reference is bound to a temporary. The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference except:

  • A temporary bound to a reference parameter in a function call (5.2.2) persists until the completion of the full-expression containing the call.

The standard also has a handy note on full-expressions and the evaluation of their subexpressions with regards to default parameters in §1.9 [intro.execution] p11:

[ Note: The evaluation of a full-expression can include the evaluation of subexpressions that are not lexically part of the full-expression. For example, subexpressions involved in evaluating default arguments (8.3.6) are considered to be created in the expression that calls the function, not the expression that defines the default argument. —end note ]

share|improve this answer

Interesting, +1. (I do not mean to compete with your nice self answer here). Just a side note for anyone interested. If you want a similar effect but allowing non-const you could use move semantics:

#include <iostream>

struct X{
   ~X(){ std::cout << "Goodbye, cruel world!\n"; }
   X(X && x){  std::cout << "moved "; }
   X(){}
};

X  f(X x = X()){
  std::cout << "Inside f()\n";
  return x;
}

void g(X x){
  std::cout << "Inside g()\n";
}

int main(){
   g(f());
}

gives

Inside f()
moved Inside g()
Goodbye, cruel world!
Goodbye, cruel world!
share|improve this answer
    
You can also just use X&& and return std::move(x). :) –  Xeo Sep 23 '12 at 18:38

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