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I've seen this so many times:

public class MyApp extends SomeLibrary
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    MyApp app = new MyApp();
    app.run();
  }
}

Instead of:

MyApp app = new MyApp();
app.run();

Why not just do:

(new MyApp()).run();

when a) garbage collection exists, b) it's clear that nothing else is going to be run inside public static void main, and that c) app is clearly not going to be referenced again?

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closed as not a real question by dystroy, João Silva, Tony Hopkinson, Abhinav Sarkar, KingCrunch Sep 23 '12 at 20:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It's a personal preference. I use both depending on how well it reads, or how well my colleagues think it's reads, other than that, no different to a where you should put your opening {. –  Tony Hopkinson Sep 23 '12 at 18:33
2  
Sometimes it is desirable to have an object to inspect when you are debugging. –  maba Sep 23 '12 at 18:35

3 Answers 3

Other than readability, there is no difference between the two ways: some IDEs actually suggest replacing the former with the latter. I actually prefer new MyApp().run(); myself.

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  • it does not make a difference (I suspect the bytecode might even be the same - EDIT: just checked: it's not)
  • the first form is generally more readable
  • the second makes sense when readability is not affected - typical example:

    new Thread(someRunnable).start();
    
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Yeah, if there is nothing more in your application, you can do it as

(new MyApp()).run();

But usually, applications are a little more complex and you assign your instance to a variable because you have initializations to do.

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