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This is driving me insane. I am trying to select a DOM element by ID in jQuery and remove it. Despite my best efforts, jQuery keeps giving me Uncaught Error: Syntax error, unrecognized expression: #li-/media/photos/KObtu.jpg

But this id definitely does exist in my DOM. So I decided to cut jQuery out of the picture and use plain ol' javascript. This worked beautifully, but I have no idea why.

function DeletePhoto() {
    //Remove a photo from the server when the delete button is clicked
    $("#personal-photo-list .delete").click( function() {
        var photoId = $(this).attr("id").split("-")[1];
        $.post("profile/DeletePhoto/", { "photo": photoId }, function(jsonObject){
            $("#li-" + photoId).remove(); //What I actually want to call. Does not work
            $("#li-/media/photos/KObtu.jpg").remove(); //I thought maybe using a variable was throwing things off.  This does not work either
            document.getElementById("li-/media/photos/KObtu.jpg").innerHTML="dsfsdfsdfsdf"; //The exact same id as the statements above. This command successfully replaces the text in the <li> tag
    });
});

}

In case anyone is curious, here is a snippet of the HTML:

<li id="li-/media/photos/KObtu.jpg">
                <img src="/media/photos/KObtu.jpg"> 
                <p> Uploaded on Sept. 23, 2012 | <a href="javascript:void(0)" id="a-/media/photos/KObtu.jpg" class="delete"> Delete </a> </p>
</li>

Thank you so much in advance.

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Why do you use so weird IDs? –  Oriol Sep 23 '12 at 19:16
    
did you try escaping the '/'? –  nandu Sep 23 '12 at 19:42
    
@user1556487: As a side-note, ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods ("."). quote from here: w3.org/TR/html4/types.html#type-id Just beware the . as jQuery treats that as a special case. –  François Wahl Sep 23 '12 at 20:47
    
@FrançoisWahl HTML5 doesn't restrict that –  Oriol Sep 24 '12 at 2:16
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the documentation:

If you wish to use any of the meta-characters ( such as !"#$%&'()*+,./:;<=>?@[\]^`{|}~ ) as a literal part of a name, you must escape the character with two backslashes: \\.

/ is a meta-character, so you have to escape it.

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1  
And .jpg is a class selector... –  mu is too short Sep 23 '12 at 19:41
    
Lets just hope the jpg won't become a png some day or we might be ending up with confusing class names. I forgot what the term for this is when one names classes like red and the likes. –  François Wahl Sep 23 '12 at 20:36
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Your LI id uses a hyphen (dash), but your jquery selector uses underscore

edit: alternatively, you could use something like:

$(this).parents("li").remove();
share|improve this answer
    
oops. Originally, my ids had underscores in them, and I switched to a desh because I read somewhere that underscores might fail in id strings. Unfortunately, I am still having the issue when I use a dash in the jQuery selector. Let me try the other suggestion you posted. –  user1556487 Sep 23 '12 at 19:27
    
presuming the second suggestion works (which it should do :p) I'd suggest getting rid of the IDs on the LI and the A tags - they're no longer needed, and as some of the other posters have pointed out, they're not exactly valid –  logical Chimp Sep 23 '12 at 21:16
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Try using $("[id='personal-photo-list'] .delete") or $("[id='li-/media/photos/KObtu.jpg']") . Working jsFiddle http://jsfiddle.net/42Vyq/1/

jQuery API: http://api.jquery.com/attribute-equals-selector/

I had the some problem when a genius developer used the class name 'user.email'

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