Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a plugin framework, which supports multiple variants of a base plugin class CPlugin : IPlugin. I am using a boost::shared_ptr<IPlugin> for all reference to the plugins, except when a subsystem needs the plugin type's specific interface. I also need the ability to clone a plugin into another seprate object. This must return a PluginPtr. This is why CPlugin is a template rather than a straight class. CPlugin::Clone() is where the template paramter is used. The following are the class definitions I am using:

IPlugin.h

#include "PluginMgr.h"
class IPlugin;
typedef boost::shared_ptr<IPlugin> PluginPtr;

class IPlugin
{
public:
  virtual PluginPtr Clone() =0;
  virtual TYPE Type() const =0;
  virtual CStdString Uuid() const =0;
  virtual CStdString Parent() const =0;
  virtual CStdString Name() const =0;
  virtual bool Disabled() const =0;

private:
  friend class CPluginMgr;
  virtual void Enable() =0;
  virtual void Disable() =0;
};

CPlugin.h

#include "IPlugin.h"
template<typename Derived>
class CPlugin : public IPlugin
{
public:
  CPlugin(const PluginProps &props);
  CPlugin(const CPlugin&);
  virtual ~CPlugin();
  PluginPtr Clone();

  TYPE Type() const { return m_type; }
  CStdString Uuid() const { return m_uuid; }
  CStdString Parent() const { return m_guid_parent; }
  CStdString Name() const { return m_strName; }
  bool Disabled() const { return m_disabled; }

private:
  void Enable() { m_disabled = false; }
  void Disable() { m_disabled = true; }

  TYPE        m_type;
  CStdString  m_uuid;
  CStdString  m_uuid_parent;
  bool        m_disabled;
};

template<typename Derived>
PluginPtr CPlugin<Derived>::Clone()
{
  PluginPtr plugin(new Derived(dynamic_cast<Derived&>(*this)));
  return plugin;
}

An example concrete class CAudioDSP.h

#include "Plugin.h"
class CAudioDSP : CPlugin<CAudioDSP>
{
  CAudioDSP(const PluginProps &props);
  bool DoSomethingTypeSpecific();
  <..snip..>
};

My problem (finally) is that CPluginMgr needs to update m_disabled of the concrete class, however as it is passed a PluginPtr it has no way to determine the type and behave differently according to the template paramater. I can't see how to avoid declaring ::Enable() and ::Disable() as private members of IPlugin instead but this instantly means that every section of the application now needs to know about the CPluginMgr class, as it is declared as a friend in the header. Circular dependancy hell ensues. I see another option, declare the Enable/Disable functions as private members of CPlugin and use boost::dynamic_pointer_cast<CVariantName> instead.

void CPluginMgr::EnablePlugin(PluginPtr plugin)
{
  if(plugin->Type == PLUGIN_DSPAUDIO)
  {
    boost::shared_ptr<CAudioDSP> dsp = boost::dynamic_pointer_cast<CAudioDSP>(plugin);
    dsp->Enable();
  }
}

This however leads to lots of duplicate code with many multiple variants of the base CPlugin template. If anyone has a better suggestion please share it!

share|improve this question
    
why is CPlugin templated? you should know that a class can be a non-template but have a templated member function (in this case clone). –  Evan Teran Aug 10 '09 at 15:48
    
Maybe I'm mising something, but can't you just do: plugin->Enable(); if plugin is of type PluginPtr?. That's kind of the point of interfaces... –  Evan Teran Aug 10 '09 at 15:50
    
I don't want any class other than CPluginMgr to be able to disable/enable plugins –  AlasdairC Aug 10 '09 at 16:27
    
You're right I should just make CPlugin::Clone a template function instead –  AlasdairC Aug 10 '09 at 16:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can easily write :

class CPluginMgr;

class IPlugIn ..
{
    friend CPluginMgr;
    ...
};

Only a predefinition is needed for friend.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't believe it's so simple, yet it is :) Thanks Christopher! –  AlasdairC Aug 10 '09 at 16:29
    
Don't forget to accept Christopher solution ... –  neuro Aug 10 '09 at 17:36
    
err I did, sorry about that –  AlasdairC Aug 16 '09 at 20:14

I think your get in trouble trying to return a shared_ptr in clone method. Why don't you make use of covariant return types? What you are doing is a common idiom called Virtual Constructor.

class IPlugin
{
public:
    virtual IPlugin* clone() = 0;
    // ...
}

class CPluginMgr;

class CPlugin : public IPlugin
{
public:
    virtual CPlugin* clone() = 0;
    friend CPluginMgr; // as @Christopher pointed out
    void Enable(bool enable) { m_disabled = !enable; }
    // ...
}

class CAudioDSP : public CPlugin 
{
public:
    virtual CAudioDSP* clone();
    // ...
}

CAudioDSP* CAudioDSP::clone()
{
    return new CAudioDSP(*this); // assume copy constructors are properly implemented
}

Returning a shared_ptr may lead you to make errors (as early destruction of temparary objects) and I think is not usually a good idea.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.