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I have a java code where I need to read many lines from a text file and I need to update records with the read lines. For example, the text file contains: aaa, bbb, ccc, .. etc (the comma means new line), so, I want to update col4 in record1 with the value aaa, record2 with the value bbb, etc.

How can I make update statement that makes the update for every record automatically ??

This is my Java code:

counter=0;
        while((fileLine=in.readLine())!=null) 
        { 
            System.out.println("Line read is: "+fileLine);

                //execute db insertion
                try {
                    //insert in the database
                    String Query= "update db.table set col4=?";    //database
                    preparedStmt3 = DBConnection.con.prepareStatement(Query); 
                    preparedStmt3.setString (1, fileLine);
                    preparedStmt3.executeUpdate();
                    System.out.println("Complete update statement for row: "+counter);
                    counter++;
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    System.out.println("DB_Error:_"+ e.toString());
                }

        } //end while loop 
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Is there another column in the table (the primary key maybe) that represents the line number? With your current query, you're updating the entire table, not a single line. –  Frank Pavageau Sep 23 '12 at 20:15
    
Your code updates the column of all rows, not only one specific record. You need to add a where clause to your update statement by which you can select the correct row. Is there some criteria by which you can connect the rows in your file with the records in the DB? –  Andreas Sep 23 '12 at 20:15
    
Yes. Assume there is a primary key which is a unique number auto increment (assume 1,2,3, etc). Can you write me the query that can move through these numbers for the whole table ? –  Jury A Sep 23 '12 at 20:21
1  
"update db.table set col4 = ? where id = ?" and preparedStmt3.setInt(2, counter) –  Frank Pavageau Sep 23 '12 at 20:29
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2 Answers

Note: As Andreas and Frank noted, your update statement looks a little incorrect. You seem to be missing a where clause from your update statement. This is because, you're trying to set only one parameter to your PreparedStatement. Ideally an update statement looks something like this:

UPDATE table_name
SET column1=?, column2=?,...
WHERE some_column=?

i.e. you at least need to have one or more columns in your where clause to identify which record or records that needs be updated. If you omit the WHERE clause, all records will be updated (which is something that you might not want to do)

Also, as a performance improvement for huge data set, consider updating in batch. So here's what you would do:

  • Create a batch size.
  • For each line that you read from your file, add it to batch. This you can do by calling the addBatch() method of PreparedStatement
  • Once you reach the batch size, execute the batch by calling executeBatch(). You would then clear you batch (clearBatch())and continue the process till you're done with reading all the lines from your file.

Something like this:

PreparedStatement preparedStmt3 = null;
try{
    counter=0;
    int batchCutoff = 1000, currentBatchSize = 0;

    Query= "update db.table set col4=?";    //database
    preparedStmt3 = DBConnection.con.prepareStatement(Query); 

    while((fileLine=in.readLine())!=null) 
    { 
        System.out.println("Line read is: "+fileLine);
        //execute db insertion
        try {
            //insert in the database
            preparedStmt3.setString (1, fileLine);
            preparedStmt3.addBatch();
            preparedStmt3.clearParameters();
            currentBatchSize++;

            if(currentBatchSize >= batchCutoff){
                preparedStmt3.executeBatch();
                preparedStmt3.clearBatch();
                System.out.println("Complete update statement for: "+currentBatchSize+" row(s)");
                currentBatchSize = 0;
            }
            counter++;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("DB_Error:_"+ e.toString());
        }
    } //end while loop 
    //In case the cut-off has not been reached and some statements in the batch are remaining
    try{
        preparedStmt3.executeBatch();
        preparedStmt3.clearBatch();
    }catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("DB_Error:_"+ e.toString());
    }finally{
        System.out.println("Total of: "+counter+" row(s) updated");
    }
}finally{
    if(preparedStmt3 != null){
        try{
            preparedStmt3.close();
        }catch(Exception exe){
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think the main issue is the update statement itself: it updates all rows. He needs to think about some where clause to define which row to update... –  Andreas Sep 23 '12 at 20:14
2  
@JuryA Batching's definitely not the problem, though you'll want to move the creation of the PreparedStatement out of the loop, set auto-commit off and commit the transaction at the end of the loop. But first, fix the query's logic. –  Frank Pavageau Sep 23 '12 at 20:25
2  
The question is: how do you connect the lines of your file with the rows of your table? Think about which line in the file corresponds to which record and how can you select it! For example, you could have one column in your table which contains the line number from your file, so that you can use this in your where clause. But it really depends on what you want to achieve ... –  Andreas Sep 23 '12 at 20:29
2  
That I expected ;) That is not how relational databases usually work - there is no such thing as "record 1", "record 2", even though in reality it can be that if you select all records you get them in the same order you inserted them, it is not guarantied. There might be a RowId column which is provided by the DB - which DB system are you using? –  Andreas Sep 23 '12 at 20:33
3  
Then there must be a column in your DB that reflects that order: id or whatever. Join on it and a inputLineNo++ in your Java code. Otherwise, mission impossible. Note: you can't easily match an autoincrement field against that order if there was any deletion in the DB. It's possible with some rather complex tricks, but it's better to fix the schema. –  full.stack.ex Sep 23 '12 at 20:34
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Since you are using a counter you can use it in where clause

----->>counter=1;
    while((fileLine=in.readLine())!=null) 
    { 
        System.out.println("Line read is: "+fileLine);

            //execute db insertion
            try {
                //insert in the database
                String Query= "update db.table set col4=? where id=?";    //database
                preparedStmt3 = DBConnection.con.prepareStatement(Query); 
                preparedStmt3.setString (1, fileLine);
       ---->>   preparedStmt3.setInt(2,counter);
                preparedStmt3.executeUpdate();
                System.out.println("Complete update statement for row: "+counter);
                counter++;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("DB_Error:_"+ e.toString());
            }

    } //end while loop 

I have inserted the arrow where I have made changes

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