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I want to implement a views counter like most forums, Youtube and several others have. So every time a user reads an article, that is stored and remembered. I also want to know who looked at the article.

My queston is: How do you implement this efficiently? What is the best practice?

One way would be to call a stored procedure for every view, but that would result in a lot of unneeded calls to the database.

Another way would be to store this to some global application object, and then store in DB every 5 minutes or so (and can you even do that in a good way?)

What's the best way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

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Database operations are surprisingly cheap and really are not worth worrying about. In the event that a DB operation was even marginally expensive then you can always delegate the blocking operation to a new thread thus freeing-up your page-generation thread (you can trivially do this for UPDATE and INSERT operations that return nothing from the database - they are inconsequential).

Sprocs aren't really in-fashion right now - the performance advantage they might have had from pre-computed execution plans is almost eliminated because modern servers cache plans from all previous queries, and for trivial SELECT, INSERT, and UPDATEs you begin to suffer from increased code complexity. There's nothing wrong with inline SQL commands now.

Anyway, back on-topic and in summary: your assumptions are wrong. There is nothing wrong with running UPDATE Pages SET ViewCount = ViewCount + 1 WHERE PageId = @pageId on every page-view. There is also nothing wrong with doing this either: INSERT INTO UserPageviews (UserId, PageId, DateTime) VALUES ( @userId, @pageId, NOW() ). Both operations are very cheap and will execute in under 2-3 miliseconds on even an old and aged database server.

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Another way would be to store this to some global application object, and then store in DB every 5 minutes or so (and can you even do that in a good way?)

This method is very prone to data loss unless you use a durable queueing mechanism (like MSMQ). Unless you anticipate massive traffic, I wouldn't even think about this approach.

Writes of this nature are inexpensive and hundreds of operations per second are not a big deal. I recently built a comment/rating framework that acheives throughput of 3000+ complete transactions per second just on my local all-in-one workstation. This included processing the request, validation, and creating multiple records within a transaction.

As a note, you should take steps to ensure that your statistics data isn't vulnerable to artificial inflation/manipulation. This part of the process will probably be more complex than the view tracking itself. For example, a user should not be able to sit and hold down the F5 key and inflate the number of views on their video. Nor should these values be manipulable by HTTP (e.g. creating a small script to send an AJAX request over and over).

This suggests that each INSERT would be preceded by a SELECT to ensure that the same user ID or IP hadn't already been recorded in some period of time. Of course, this isn't foolproof (unless you invest a great deal of effort), but it errs on the side of conservatism which is usually a good approach.

One way would be to call a stored procedure for every view, but that would result in a lot of unneeded calls to the database.

I regularly have to remind myself (and other developers) to not fear the database. People (me included) sometimes go to great lengths to avoid a few simple database calls. Keep your tables narrow and well-indexed, and operations like this are faster than you might think.

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