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I think I have a fairly firm grasp on using the synchronized keyword to prevent inconsistencies between threads in java, but I don't fully understand what happens if you don't use that keyword.

Say for instance that I have a field accessed/modified by two threads:

private String sharedString = "";

class OneThread extends Thread {

  private Boolean mRunning = false;

  public OneThread() {}

  public synchronized setRunning(Boolean b) {
    mRunning = b;
  }

  @Override
  public void run() {
    while (mRunning) {
      // read or write to shared string
      sharedString = "text from thread 1";
      System.out.println("String seen from thread 1: " + sharedString);
      super.run();
    }
  }
}

class AnotherThread extends Thread {

  private Boolean mRunning = false;

  public AnotherThread() {}

  public synchronized setRunning(Boolean b) {
    mRunning = b;
  }

  @Override
  public void run() {
    while (mRunning) {
      // read or write to shared string
      sharedString = "text from thread 2";
      System.out.println("String seen from thread 2: " + sharedString);
      super.run();
    }
  }
}

Since both of these threads are accessing and modifying the field sharedString without using the synchronized keyword, I would expect inconsistencies. What I am wondering is what actually happens though. While debugging, I have stepped carefully through both threads in situations like this and noticed that even while one thread is paused, it's state can be "sticky".

For the sake of the above example, suppose both threads are paused in the debugger. If I step through one of the threads and leave the other paused, I would expect it would operate like a single threaded application. Yet, many times right after modifying the field, the next line that accesses it retrieves the "wrong" value (a value inconsistent with what it was just modified to).

I know that this code is not good.. but I am asking the question because I'm hoping someone could provide an answer that gives some insight into what actually happens in the virtual machine when multi-threaded applications are implemented poorly. Does the thread who's field modification attempt was unsuccessful have any effect at all?

If after poorly implementing multi-threaded code we are simply in the realm of "undefined" behavior, and there is no value in learning about this behavior, I'm ok with that.. just a multi-threading noob trying to understand what I observe in the debugger.

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3  
"If after poorly implementing multi-threaded code we are simply in the realm of "undefined" behavior" => Yes that's a good approximation of reality. –  assylias Sep 23 '12 at 22:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is due to another critical function of synchronization across threads in Java: preventing data staleness. As part of the Java Memory Model, a Java thread may cache values for shared data. There is no guarantee that a thread will ever see updates made by another thread unless either the shared mutable data is accessed in synchronized blocks or it is marked as volatile. See here for more information.

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Per-thread caching explains my observations. Thanks so much for the information and link, which was very helpful. –  snapfractalpop Sep 24 '12 at 15:46

There's really no way for the printout to be "wrong" if there is no other thread that can change the shared value (as would be the case if there are really only 2 threads and one is definitely paused). Can you by chance provide the code that "kicks off" these 2 threads (i.e. your main)?

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I did not run this exact code, but the start for each thread would be something like: OneThread oneThread = new OneThread(); oneThread.setRunning(true); oneThread.start(); for each thread. I'm fairly sure that laz's answer explains my observations. –  snapfractalpop Sep 24 '12 at 15:54
    
I don't see how that is possible if one thread is paused. Even if the code and data aren't correctly synchronized, the bottom line is if no other thread is running, you assign a value, then immediately read that value, it cannot have changed. But if your mind's made up... –  eattrig Sep 24 '12 at 23:53
    
My observations were misleading me. Suppose both threads were paused: the first thread just before the field modification, and the second thread just after the field modification (but before the read). Stepping through the modification statement on the first thread, then subsequently on the read of the second thread, I expected the read to return the value just then updated by the first thread. But since the field was not declared volatile, each thread had it's own cached copy, and the second thread's cached data was stale (what in my noobness called "sticky"). –  snapfractalpop Sep 25 '12 at 17:41
    
Ok. Thanks for the clarification. I think I learned something too :). And thanks for coming back to answer. –  eattrig Sep 25 '12 at 23:29

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