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I have a drop down menu, and clicking the icon should add the class "Open" to its parent, and then clicking the menu anywhere should close it. But the function inside the bind fires when the icon is clicked. The effect being it adds the class Open, and then removes it straight away.

This is probably a simple issue, but I cannot seem to work out why the 'click' event fires straight away!?

This question may be similar but can't still can't work it out: jQuery bind event firing the event

$(function () {

    $(".ui-dropdown-action").bind("click", function () {
        $(this).parent()
            .addClass("Open")
            .bind("click", function () {
                $(this).removeClass("Open");
            });
    });

});
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried on() instead of bind()? On works differently to bind and I have had similar issues using bind. Also On is now prefered to bind. – Zappa Sep 23 '12 at 22:14
    
Suggested reading: MDN examples on Event Propagation – bfavaretto Sep 23 '12 at 22:15
    
As of jQuery 1.7, the .on() method is the preferred method for attaching event handlers to a document. – Aesthete Sep 23 '12 at 22:17
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you might have a problem with the click event bubbling up the DOM tree. Which is why click is also being fired on the parent.

if you pass in the event object as an argument for the first bind and call event.stopPropagation() as follows

$(function () {

  $(".ui-dropdown-action").bind("click", function (event) {
    event.stopPropagation();
    $(this).parent()
        .addClass("Open")
        .bind("click", function () {
            $(this).removeClass("Open");
        });
  });

});

should fix your issue.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't deal with the other issues in the code. It's just temporarily masking them. – I Hate Lazy Sep 23 '12 at 23:01
    
His question was about event bubbling. Not binding multiple events listeners to the same handler. That is a separate issue and not the cause of his problem. Its not masking anything. He doesn't want the event bubbling up to the parent regardless of how many times the parent has a click event listener attached. – Mark Sep 23 '12 at 23:02
    
Yeah, you're right. Screw 'em. Let him find his own bugs sometime in the future (hopefully). – I Hate Lazy Sep 23 '12 at 23:37
    
Making recommendations to improve someones code is great. However, if those recommendations don't answer the question then its not worthy of an answer but a comment instead. – Mark Sep 23 '12 at 23:49
    
Different pedagogical philosophies I guess. – I Hate Lazy Sep 23 '12 at 23:51

You can pass the event argument and stop the bubbling of the event .. Try this

$(function () {

        $(".ui-dropdown-action").bind("click", function () {
            $(this).parent()
                .addClass("Open")
                .unbind().bind("click", function (e) {
                    $(this).removeClass("Open");
                    e.stopPropagation();
                });
        });

    });

This will make sure the parent event will not fire when the icon is clicked.. Also every single time you click the icon the event for the parent is bound again which will create multiple click events .. Need to make sure you unbind and bind them again to avoid that..

share|improve this answer
    
Apparently this is the right method, but because it's firing first time, the e.stopPropagation() should be a level up (inside the first bind). Thanks though! – jamie-wilson Sep 23 '12 at 22:35
    
Constant binding/unbinding is an anti-pattern and usually an indication that you're doing something wrong. – I Hate Lazy Sep 23 '12 at 22:37
    
ya true,, But every single time you click the dropdown-action class you are binding a new click event to the parent class.. How would you expect do control this behaviour..?? – Sushanth -- Sep 23 '12 at 23:06
    
Something like this. Other solutions exist as well. I'm sceptical of the nested handlers, but can't tell if it's appropriate without more info. If you post a more idiomatic solution, I'd +1 you. – I Hate Lazy Sep 23 '12 at 23:28
    
...even this would probably do the trick if clicking the nested element should also close the menu. – I Hate Lazy Sep 23 '12 at 23:35

It is firing right away because the click event is bubbling to the parent and then firing that selector. To fix this you could use a setTimeout() around the 2nd bind.

$(function () {
  $(".ui-dropdown-action").bind("click", function () {
    var parent = $(this).parent();
    parent.addClass("Open");
    setTimeout(function() {
      parent.bind("click", function () {
        $(this).removeClass("Open");
      });
    }, 0);
  });
});

Another option would be to to a stopPropagation() on the event on your first bind, though that would prevent any other handlers from triggering on that event.

share|improve this answer
2  
You can stop an event from bubbling up the DOM. setTimeout would be unnecessary. – Mark Sep 23 '12 at 22:17
    
Agreed Mark, though it is possible that he may have handlers further up the chain that he would want to fire on that event. I edited my answer to reflect that. – f1sherman Sep 23 '12 at 22:35

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