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I am pretty new to JS - so just wondering whether you know how to solve this problem.

Current I have in my code

<a href='#' class="closeLink">close</a>

Which runs some JS to close a box. The problem I have is that when the user clicks on the link - the href="#" takes the user to the top of page when this happens.

How to solve this so it doesn't do this ? i.e. I cant use someting like onclick="return false" as I imagine that will stop the JS from working ?

Thanks

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7 Answers 7

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The usual way to do this is to return false from your javascript click handler. This will both prevent the event from bubbling up and cancel the normal action of the event. It's been my experience that this is typically the behavior you want.

jQuery example:

$('.closeLink').click( function() {
      ...do the close action...
      return false;
});

If you want to simply prevent the normal action you can, instead, simply use preventDefault.

$('.closeLink').click( function(e) {
     e.preventDefault();
     ... do the close action...
});
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2  
+1 - note if you're not using jQuery, make sure to check if window.event exists and if so, set window.event.returnValue = false before returning false - IE doesn't always stop bubbling unless you do this. –  Rex M Aug 10 '09 at 16:01
    
cool thanks a lot - learning as i go! :) –  Tom Aug 10 '09 at 16:02
    
-1. While this works, event.preventDefault at the BEGINNING of the function is the correct way to do it. –  David Murdoch Apr 7 '11 at 20:28
    
@David - I've updated to note your comment. My experience is that in almost all circumstances the behavior desired is to both cancel the normal action and prevent bubbling. YMMV. –  tvanfosson Apr 7 '11 at 21:28
    
-1 retracted. :-) However, if you have an uncaught exception before the return false the link WILL be followed (or the #, in OP case). –  David Murdoch Apr 8 '11 at 2:18

The easiest way to solve this problem is to just add another character after the pound symbol like this:

<a href='#a' class="closeLink">close</a>

Problem solved. Yes, it was that easy. Some may hate this answer, but they cannot deny that it works.

Just make sure you don't actually have a section assigned to "a" or it will go to that part of the page. (I don't see this as often as I use to, though) "#" by itself, by default, goes to the top of the page.

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return false is the answer, but I usually do this instead:

$('.closeLink').click( function(event) {
      event.preventDefault();
      ...do the close action...
});

Stops the action from happening before you run your code.

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return false works, but it isn't the answer in all cases. return false calls both event.preventDefault AND event.stopPropagation. stopPropagation will prevent any other event attached to the object from firing. Which you may or may not want. –  David Murdoch Apr 7 '11 at 20:26

Although it seems to be very popular, href='#' is not a magic keyword for JavaScript, it's just a regular link to an empty anchor and as such it's pretty pointless. You basically have two options:

  1. Implement an alternative for JavaScript-unaware user agents, use the href parameter to point to it and cancel the link with JavaScript. E.g.:

    <a href="close.php" onclick="close(); return false">

  2. When the noscript alternative is not available or relevant, you don't need a link at all:

    <span onclick="close(); return false">Close</span>

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+1 for '#" is just an empty anchor without special meaning ... thanks. –  Faisal Vali Sep 7 '09 at 18:23

JavaScript version:

myButton.onclick=function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    // code
    return false;
}

jQuery version:

$('.myButtonClass').click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    // code
    return false;
});

This just do the job well! :)

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If your code is getting passed the eventObject you could use preventDefault(); returning false also helps.

mylink.onclick = function(e){
 e.preventDefault();
 // stuff
 return false;
}
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Wrap a div statement around a link, have the link return false, add the javascript functionality to the div on click...

<div onClick="javascript:close();">
    <a href="#" onclick="javascript:return false;">Close</a>
</div>
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