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In my GWT application I have a javascript function wich require an array of array as argument. I get the data using RPC, so I get a List< List > from my database. I need this because I have to fill a kind of tree view. For example, I get this from my RPC call: {"A", "A1", "A2"}, {"B", "B1"}, and I have to pass this to my javascript function: [["A", "A1", "A2"], ["B", "B1"]]. In my interface I want to show:

A+
  A1
  A2
B+
  B1

How can I pass it to my javascript function using JSNI?

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Why do you need JSNI? Can't you do it in GWT? –  Andrei - Angels Like Rebels Sep 24 '12 at 0:31
    
Yes, I think we could do it in GWT but we have to use that javascript function. –  jav_000 Sep 24 '12 at 9:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you can live without DevMode (because you use SuperDevMode for instance), Java arrays are the same as JsArray* in production mode, so String[][] is the same as JsArray<JsArrayString>.
In DevMode, there's JsArrayUtils which can help (makes a copy in DevMode, returns as-is in production mode, with no overhead), but not for nested arrays (and actually not even for arrays of strings), so not in your case.

If you need/want either lists rather than arrays, or DevMode support, then you'll have to copy the data into a JsArray<JsArrayString>.

If you can use arrays but need DevMode support, you can use GWT.isScript() to make a specific code branch: make a copy into a JsArray<JsArrayString> in DevMode, pass the array as-is in prod mode (that also means 2 JSNI methods, for JsArray<JsArrayString> and String[][])

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Do you know how the type signature looks like? Lcom/google/gwt/core/client/JsArrayNumber; is a JsArrayNumber but how to write a JsArray<JsArrayNumber>? –  Stefan Falk May 22 '13 at 20:42
1  
Because Java generics work by type erasure, the generic type arguments are not encoded. –  Thomas Broyer May 23 '13 at 9:02
    
Thanks, I got it then over night here. :) –  Stefan Falk May 23 '13 at 9:30

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