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Rather than a long explanation, I think a few lines of code will be clearer to explain my problem. Lets say I have 2 classes, one inheriting from the other :

#include <iostream>
class A{
    public: 
        void parse() 
        {
            treatLine();
        };
        void treatLine()
        {
            std::cout << "treatLine in A" << std::endl;
        }
};

class B : public A{
    public:
        void treatLine()
        {
            std::cout << "treatLine in B" << std::endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    B b;
    b.parse();
    return 0;
}

When executing, surprisingly for me, it prints "treatLine in A". Is it possible to make function treatLine from class B to be called whith an object of type B (ie "treatLine in B" would be print for the code above)? And keep the possibility of creating an object of type A that would print "treatLine in A"

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All B's does is shadow A's, not override it. You're missing a key word in there. –  chris Sep 24 '12 at 0:32
    
@chris B's method treatLine does override A's method, doesn't it ? –  Ote Sep 24 '12 at 1:06
    
If it did, it would be overriding the call, don't you think? You need the virtual there (only required in the base class, optional in the derived class) to mark the function as one to be overriden. Since C++11, you can also do this in the derived class, which would have given you a compiler error for it not being virtual: void treatLine() override {...}. –  chris Sep 24 '12 at 1:12
    
well, that was the point of my question, I did not know the need to use the word virtual to make my function overriden. I know that now :) –  Ote Sep 24 '12 at 1:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make treatLine virtual:

virtual void treatLine() {
    std::cout << "treatLine in A" << std::endl;
}

That way, the function will be called based on the runtime type of the object (called the "dynamic type"), instead of the compiletime type (called the "static type") of the object.

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Great ! thanks for the solution AND the explanation –  Ote Sep 24 '12 at 1:02
    
@JerryCoffin thanks, I added a note about the terminology. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 24 '12 at 1:17
    
@JerryCoffin haha, fixed :) Bad reading, I thought I would have mentioned static first and dynamic second. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 24 '12 at 1:29
    
Making treatLine virtual would give calls to treatLine an extra overhead and an extra, hidden, member variable (the pointer to the vtable) would be put in all instances of A and B. Re-defining void parse() in B the way it is defined in A would not, and would most likely give the result Ote is looking for. You should generally only use virtual functions when you have pointer-to-the-base-class pointers which can potentially point to instances of many different classes in the same hierarchy. In this case, the curiously recurring template pattern can also be used to overload parse. –  HelloGoodbye Sep 24 '13 at 10:37

Make the treatLine function in A virtual

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