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I'm using Tapestry5 and Hibernate. I'm trying to build a criteria query that uses dynamic restrictions generated from the URL. My URL context is designed like a key/value pair.

Example

www.mywebsite.com/make/ford/model/focus/year/2009

I decode the parameters as followed

private Map<String, String> queryParameters;
private List<Vehicle> vehicles;

    void onActivate(EventContext context) {
            //Count is 6 - make/ford/model/focus/year/2009
            int count = context.getCount();

            if (count > 0) {
                int i;
                for (i = 0; (i + 1) < count; i += 2) {
                    String name = context.get(String.class, i);
                    String value = context.get(String.class, i + 1);

                    example "make"
                    System.out.println("name " + name);

                    example "ford"
                    System.out.println("value " + value);

                    this.queryParameters.put(name, value);
                }
            }  

            this.vehicles = this.session.createCriteria(Vehicle.class)
...add dynamic restrictions. 
        }

I was hoping someone could help me to figure out how to dynamically add the list of restrictions to my query. I'm sure this has been done, so if anybody knows of a post, that would be helpful too. Thanks

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4 Answers 4

Exactly as the other answer said, but here more spelt out. I think the crux of your question is really 'show me how to add a restriction'. That is my interpretation anyhow.

You need to decode each restriction into its own field.

You need to know the Java entity property name for each field.

Then build a Map of these 2 things, the key is the known static Java entity property name and the value is the URL decoded data (possibly with type conversion).

private Map<String, Object> queryParameters;
private List<Vehicle> vehicles;

void onActivate(EventContext context) {
        //Count is 6 - make/ford/model/focus/year/2009
        int count = context.getCount();

        queryParameters = new HashMap<String,Object>();
        if (count > 0) {
            int i;
            for (i = 0; (i + 1) < count; i += 2) {
                String name = context.get(String.class, i);
                String value = context.get(String.class, i + 1);

                Object sqlValue = value;
                if("foobar".equals(name)) {
                    // sometime you don't want a String type for SQL compasition
                    //  so convert it
                    sqlValue = UtilityClass.doTypeConversionForFoobar(value);
                } else if("search".equals(name) ||
                          "model".equals(name) ||
                          "year".equals(name)) {
                    // no-op this is valid 'name'
                } else if("make".equals(name)) {
                    // this is a suggestion depends on your project conf
                    name = "vehicleMake.name";
                } else {
                    continue;  // ignore values we did not expect
                }
                // FIXME: You should validate all 'name' values 
                // to be valid and/or convert to Java property names here

                System.out.println("name " + name);
                System.out.println("value " + value);

                this.queryParameters.put(name, sqlValue);
            }
        }  

        Criteria crit = this.session.createCriteria(Vehicle.class)
        for(Map.Entry<String,Object> e : this.queryParameters.entrySet()) {
            String n = e.getKey();
            Object v = e.getValue();
            // Sometimes you don't want a direct compare 'Restructions.eq()'
            if("search".equals(n))
                crit.add(Restrictions.like(n, "%" + v + "%"));
            else  // Most of the time you do
                crit.add(Restrictions.eq(n, v));
        }

        this.vehicles = crit.list();  // run query
    }

See also https://docs.jboss.org/hibernate/orm/3.5/reference/en/html/querycriteria.html

With the above there should be no risk of SQL injection, since the "name" and "n" part should be 100% validated against a known good list. The "value" and "v" is correctly escaped, just like using SQL position placeholder '?'.

E&OE

share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be exactly what I was looking for. I have one additional question. In my example url, I'm using "make" as a name, however that isn't actually the name in my entity. It would actually be "vehicleMake.name". I'd like to keep the url parameter clean with just "make", I'm wondering if I should reference vehicleMake.name in the code with make, perhaps in an enum or something. I'm not sure exactly how to do it though. Thanks so much for your help. –  Code Junkie Sep 24 '12 at 2:33
    
Edited with idea to try on vehicleName.name .. also correction to use crit.list() call –  Darryl Miles Sep 24 '12 at 11:23

I would assume you would just loop over the parameters Map and add a Restriction for each pair.

Be aware that this will open you up to sql injection attacks if you are not careful. the easiest way to protect against this would be to check the keys against the known Vehicle properties before adding to the Criteria.

share|improve this answer

Another option would be to create an example query by building an object from the name/value pairs:

Vehicle vehicle = new Vehicle();
int count = context.getCount();
int i;
for (i = 0; (i + 1) < count; i += 2) {
  String name = context.get(String.class, i);
  String value = context.get(String.class, i + 1);
  // This will call the setter for the name, passing the value
  // So if name is 'make' and value is 'ford', it will call vehicle.setMake('ford')
  BeantUtils.setProperty(vehicle, name, value);
}

// This is using a Hibernate example query:
vehicles = session.createCriteria(Vehicle.class).add(Example.create(vehicle)).list();

See BeanUtils.setProperty and Example Queries for more info.

That assumes you are allowing only one value per property and that the query parameters map to the property names correctly. There may also be conversion issues to think about but I think setProperty handles the common ones.

share|improve this answer
    
could you show more in your example, I'm a bit confused with what's going on with Beantutils and Example.create. Thanks Brian. –  Code Junkie Sep 24 '12 at 13:31
    
Added some comments and links to help make it more clear. –  Brian Deterling Sep 24 '12 at 14:15

If they are query paramaters you should treat them as query parameters instead of path parameters. Your URL should look something like:

www.mywebsite.com/vehicles?make=ford&model=focus&year=2009

and your code should look something like this:

public class Vehicles {

@ActivationRequestParameter
private String make;

@ActivationRequestParameter
private String model;

@ActivationRequestParameter
private String year;

@Inject
private Session session;

@OnEvent(EventConstants.ACTIVATE)
void activate() {
    Criteria criteria = session.createCriteria(Vehicle.class);

    if (make != null) criteria.add(Restrictions.eq("make", make));
    if (model != null) criteria.add(Restrictions.eq("model", model));
    if (year != null) criteria.add(Restrictions.eq("year", year));

    vehicles = criteria.list();
}

}

Assuming you are using the Grid component to display the vehicles I'd highly recommend using the HibernateGridDataSource instead of making the query in the "activate" event handler.

public class Vehicles {

    @ActivationRequestParameter
    private String make;

    @ActivationRequestParameter
    private String model;

    @ActivationRequestParameter
    private String year;

    @Inject
    private Session session;

    @OnEvent(EventConstants.ACTIVATE)
    void activate() {
    }

    public GridDataSource getVehicles() {
        return new HibernateGridDataSource(session, Vehicles.class) {
            @Override
            protected void applyAdditionalConstraints(Criteria criteria) {
                if (make != null) criteria.add(Restrictions.eq("make", make));
                if (model != null) criteria.add(Restrictions.eq("model", model));
                if (year != null) criteria.add(Restrictions.eq("year", year));
            }
        };
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would first like to say thanks for the excellent example! The reason I wanted to use path parameters opposed to query parameters is purely for SEO reasons. I always assumed clean URLS minus symbols was better for SEO, however I may be wrong since nobody really knows googles algorithm anyhow. Perhaps you could comment on this. Also could you explain the HibernateGridDataSource? This is the first I've ever seen it. Thanks so much. –  Code Junkie Sep 26 '12 at 0:28
    
The "source" parameter of the Grid component is often a List or an array, but it can also take a GridDataSource. The HibernateGridDataSource will handle the ordering and pagination for you and it will bring from the database only the elements that are going to be displayed. It's much more efficient than "criteria.list();", specially with large datasets. tapestry.apache.org/current/apidocs/org/apache/tapestry5/… –  ascandroli Sep 27 '12 at 15:53

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