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In order to establish seasonal effects on energy use, I need to align the energy use information that I have from a billing database with monthly temperatures.

I'm working with a billing dataset that has bills of varying lengths and start and end dates, and I'd like to obtain the monthly average for each account within each month. For example, I have a billing database that has the following characteristics:

   acct amount      begin        end days
1  2242  11349 2009-10-06 2009-11-04   29
2  2242  12252 2009-11-04 2009-12-04   30
3  2242  21774 2009-12-04 2010-01-08   35
4  2242  18293 2010-01-08 2010-02-05   28
5  2243  27217 2009-10-06 2009-11-04   29
6  2243    117 2009-11-04 2009-12-04   30
7  2243  14543 2009-12-04 2010-01-08   35

I would like to figure out how to coerce these somewhat irregular time series (for each account) to get the average amount per day within each month that is spanned within each bill, such that:

   acct amount      begin        end days avgamtpday
1  2242  11349 2009-10-01 2009-10-31   31          X
2  2242  12252 2009-11-01 2009-11-30   30          X
3  2242  21774 2009-12-01 2010-12-31   31          X
4  2242  18293 2010-01-01 2010-01-31   31          X
4  2242  18293 2010-02-01 2010-02-28   28          X
5  2243  27217 2009-10-01 2009-10-31   31          X
6  2243    117 2009-11-01 2009-11-30   30          X
7  2243  14543 2009-12-01 2009-12-31   30          X
7  2243  14543 2010-01-01 2010-01-31   31          X

I'm fairly agnostic to whichever tool can do this, since I only have to do this once.

An additional wrinkle is the table is about 150,000 rows long, which is not really very big by most standards, but big enough to make a loop solution in R difficult. I've investigated using the zoo, xts, and tempdisagg packages in R. I started writing a really ugly loop that would split each bill, then create one row for each month within an existing bill, and then tapply() to summarize by accts and months, but honestly, couldn't see how to do it efficiently.

In MySQL, I've tried this:

create or replace view v3 as select 1 n union all select 1 union all select 1;
create or replace view v as select 1 n from v3 a, v3 b union all select 1;
set @n = 0;
drop table if exists calendar; create table calendar(dt date primary key);
insert into calendar
select cast('2008-1-1' + interval @n:=@n+1 day as date) as dt from v a, v b, v c, v d, v e, v;

select acct, amount, begin, end, billAmtPerDay, sum(billAmtPerDay), MonthAmt, count() Days, sum(billAmtPerDay)/count() AverageAmtPerDay, year(dt), month(dt) FROM ( select *, amount/days billAmtPerDay from bills b inner join calendar c on dt between begin and end and begin <> dt) x group by acct, amount, begin, end, billAmtPerDay, year(dt), month(dt);

But for reasons I don't understand, my server doesn't like this table, and gets hung up on the inner join, even when I stage the different calculations. I'm investigating if there are any temporary memory limits on it.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Do your billing periods coincide with real months, or is it some function "Day X of every month is when a new period starts" type situation? –  Marc B Sep 24 '12 at 1:29
    
The billing periods are irregular, so most bills are on average 30 +/- 2 days long, but with some bills as long as 90 days or more. –  D. Hsu Sep 24 '12 at 1:43
1  
Then you'd need some method to calculate a billing period given just a date, so you can do proper grouping. –  Marc B Sep 24 '12 at 1:44
    
@D.Hsu Was the answer ok? Don't forget to accept one of the answers if it was. –  Matt Dowle Oct 5 '12 at 8:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's a start using data.table :

billdata <- read.table(text=" acct amount begin end days
1 2242 11349 2009-10-06 2009-11-04 29
2 2242 12252 2009-11-04 2009-12-04 30
3 2242 21774 2009-12-04 2010-01-08 35
4 2242 18293 2010-01-08 2010-02-05 28
5 2243 27217 2009-10-06 2009-11-04 29
6 2243 117 2009-11-04 2009-12-04 30
7 2243 14543 2009-12-04 2010-01-08 35", sep=" ", header=TRUE, row.names=1)

require(data.table)
DT = as.data.table(billdata)

First, change type of columns begin and end to dates. Unlike data.frame, this doesn't copy the entire dataset.

DT[,begin:=as.Date(begin)]
DT[,end:=as.Date(end)]

Then find the time span, find the prevailing bill for each day, and aggregate.

alldays = DT[,seq(min(begin),max(end),by="day")]

setkey(DT, acct, begin)

DT[CJ(unique(acct),alldays),
   mean(amount/days,na.rm=TRUE),
   by=list(acct,month=format(begin,"%Y-%m")), roll=TRUE]

    acct   month        V1
 1: 2242 2009-10 391.34483
 2: 2242 2009-11 406.69448
 3: 2242 2009-12 601.43226
 4: 2242 2010-01 646.27465
 5: 2242 2010-02 653.32143
 6: 2243 2009-10 938.51724
 7: 2243 2009-11  97.36172
 8: 2243 2009-12 375.68065
 9: 2243 2010-01 415.51429
10: 2243 2010-02 415.51429

I think you'll find the prevailing join logic quite cumbersome in SQL, and slower.

I say it's a hint because it's not quite correct. Notice row 10 is repeated because account 2243 doesn't stretch into 2010-02 unlike account 2242. To finish it off you could rbind in the last row for each account and use rolltolast instead of roll. Or perhaps create alldays by account rather than across all accounts.

See if speed is acceptable on the above, and we can go from there.

It's likely you will hit a bug in 1.8.2 that has been fixed in 1.8.3. I'm using v1.8.3.

"Internal" error message when combining join containing missing groups and group by is fixed, #2162. For example : X[Y,.N,by=NonJoinColumn] where Y contains some rows that don't match to X. This bug could also result in a seg fault.

Let me know and we can either work around, or upgrade to 1.8.3 from R-Forge.

Btw, nice example data. That made it quicker to answer.


Here's the full answer alluded to above. It's a bit tricky I have to admit, as it combines together several features of data.table. This should work in 1.8.2 as it happens, but I've only tested in 1.8.3.

DT[ setkey(DT[,seq(begin[1],last(end),by="day"),by=acct]),
    mean(amount/days,na.rm=TRUE),
    by=list(acct,month=format(begin,"%Y-%m")), roll=TRUE]

   acct   month        V1
1: 2242 2009-10 391.34483
2: 2242 2009-11 406.69448
3: 2242 2009-12 601.43226
4: 2242 2010-01 646.27465
5: 2242 2010-02 653.32143
6: 2243 2009-10 938.51724
7: 2243 2009-11  97.36172
8: 2243 2009-12 375.68065
9: 2243 2010-01 415.51429
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Matthew, sorry not to respond earlier -- I've run both methods, and the data.table solution is much faster, but they give different answers, so I'm checking out the code on both right now. –  D. Hsu Oct 7 '12 at 21:50
1  
@D.Hsu From a quick glance, I think the other answer might be double counting the end days of each bill, since the example data could be considered ambiguous. My answer uses [begin,end) not [begin,end]. –  Matt Dowle Oct 8 '12 at 7:23
    
Matt, I checked it out, and your code works well. The reason why it took me a couple of days to check out was that I actually was thinking of a slightly different calculation than the one I posed in the problem. Nonetheless, the data.table function is very fast, and was relatively much easier to modify for my (eventual) purposes. Thanks for developing the package as well as answering my question. –  D. Hsu Oct 10 '12 at 20:50
    
@D.Hsu My pleasure, thanks for the update. –  Matt Dowle Oct 10 '12 at 21:05

Here is one way to do it:

billdata <- read.table(text=" acct amount begin end days
1 2242 11349 2009-10-06 2009-11-04 29
2 2242 12252 2009-11-04 2009-12-04 30
3 2242 21774 2009-12-04 2010-01-08 35
4 2242 18293 2010-01-08 2010-02-05 28
5 2243 27217 2009-10-06 2009-11-04 29
6 2243 117 2009-11-04 2009-12-04 30
7 2243 14543 2009-12-04 2010-01-08 35", sep=" ", header=TRUE, row.names=1)

#First, declare your columns "begin" and "end" as dates:
strptime(billdata$begin, format="%Y-%m-%d") -> billdata$begin
strptime(billdata$end, format="%Y-%m-%d") -> billdata$end

#Then create a column with the amount per day on the billing period:
billdata$avg_on_period<-billdata$amount/billdata$days

#Then split it into days:
temp <- data.frame(acct=c(),month=c(),day=c(), avg=c())
for(i in 1:nrow(billdata)){
    X <- billdata[i,]
    seq(X$begin,X$end,by="day") -> list_day
    rbind(temp, data.frame(acct=rep(X$acct,length(list_day)), 
        month=format(list_day, "%Y-%m"), day=format(list_day, "%d"), 
        avg=rep(X$avg_on_period, length(list_day)))) -> temp
    }

# And finally merge the different days of the months together:
output<-aggregate(temp$avg, by=list(temp$month,temp$acct), FUN=mean)

colnames(output) <- c("Month","Account","Average per day")

output
    Month Account Average per day
1 2009-10    2242       391.34483
2 2009-11    2242       406.69448
3 2009-12    2242       595.40000
4 2010-01    2242       645.51964
5 2010-02    2242       653.32143
6 2009-10    2243       938.51724
7 2009-11    2243        97.36172
8 2009-12    2243       364.06250
9 2010-01    2243       415.51429
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this quick reply. I've delayed responding as I try out the code. However, I perhaps should have mentioned before that I want to apply this to a relatively large dataset: 150,000 rows, and this only made it through about 10% of the code in 5-6 hours (on a very fast server). I think this is probably better solved using SQL. –  D. Hsu Oct 1 '12 at 20:36
    
Indeed if your dataset is 150 000 rows long, the intermediate temp dataset would be several millions rows long. There is probably a good solution using data.table but I never used it so I can't help here. –  plannapus Oct 2 '12 at 6:18
    
plannapus, @D.Hsu, Yes it's a great question and ideal for data.table. I'll add an answer later. –  Matt Dowle Oct 2 '12 at 10:51

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