Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to figure out how to have a private instance variable on my class that gets set by a parameter of a public method. In this case, though; it seems that outside of somePublicMethod myPrivateVar will be undefined. How can achieve what I am trying to do ?

MyClass = function() {
    var myPrivateVar;

    this.somePublicMethod(myPrivateVar) {
        myPrivateVar = myPrivateVar //????
    }

    this.someOtherPublicMethod() {
        somePrivateMethod();
    }

    function somePrivateMethod() {
        myPrivateVar++;
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The issue is you're shadowing the var myPrivateVar by giving the argument the same name, so only the argument variable is in scope:

this.somePublicMethod = function(myPrivateVar) {
    myPrivateVar = myPrivateVar; // sets the argument to itself
}

You'll need to give one of them a different name to avoid shadowing:

this.somePublicMethod = function(inputVar) {
    myPrivateVar = inputVar;
};

Otherwise, you'll need to contain one of them somehow:

MyClass = function () {
    var locals = {
        myPrivateVar: null
    };

    this.somePublicMethod = function (myPrivateVar) {
        locals.myPrivateVar = myPrivateVar;
    };

    function somePrivateMethod() {
        locals.myPrivateVar++;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
This solution works, but it's not too elegant when I have to use a different name for the input variable. – prettymuchbryce Sep 24 '12 at 1:38
1  
@prettymuchbryce Elegant or not, you can't declare 2 variables with the same name in different scopes and still reach both. Either rename or contain one (see edit for the latter). – Jonathan Lonowski Sep 24 '12 at 1:44
    
Okay fair enough. I like the locals = {} solution. Thanks. – prettymuchbryce Sep 24 '12 at 1:47

Use this.myPrivateVar:

this.somePublicMethod = function(myPrivateVar) {
    this.myPrivateVar = myPrivateVar;
}

To call the private method within the context of this, you can use:

this.somePublicMethod = function(myPrivateVar) {
    this.myPrivateVar = myPrivateVar;
    somePrivateMethod.call(this); // pass this as the context of the private method
}

function somePrivateMethod() {
    this.myPrivateVar++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is good, but won't fit for this specific case. See my updated example to see why. – prettymuchbryce Sep 24 '12 at 1:39

Have you considered taking a slightly different route?

var MyClass = function(){
    var bar = "private";
    return {
        setBar: function( newBar ) { bar = newBar; },
        getBar: function() { return bar; }
    }
};

When you new-up an instance of this class, the bar property will be private. However, it will still be accessible by the public setBar and getBar methods.

var inst = new MyClass;

console.log( inst.bar ); // undefined
console.log( inst.getBar() ); // 'private'

inst.setBar( 'accessible' );

console.log( inst.getBar() ); // 'accessible'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.