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I have a class that stores an array of 16 floats. I use a float pointer to store them as an array, as such I have to initialize the array with the new operator inside the constructor. My question is, is it more more efficient/better practice to define an array of 16 floats directly as part of of the class, or should I continue to have the class store the data through a pointer and call new in the constructor?

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3  
Use std::array for fixed-size arrays and std::vector otherwise (unless another type suits your needs better), or if you don't have C++11. If the same values are being used for every instance, make it static. –  chris Sep 24 '12 at 1:37
    
If you always need that float array, it is more reasonable to have array as member. It is more efficient and code is cleaner. Of course, if you want to have them "optional", or in case you need a big array, allocating from heap will be more reasonable –  Adrian Shum Sep 24 '12 at 2:08

2 Answers 2

There is no universal "better practice" when it comes to memory management, so you should do what's right for your particular design.

If you always allocate precisely 16 floats, embedding the array inside your class will reduce the number of calls to the dynamic allocator. This may be helpful when the object is stored in the automatic memory, but there are situations when it may harm. For example, if you create large arrays of this class in automatic storage, embedding the array would increase the chances of overflowing the stack.

The best approach is to profile your memory use and your timing, and see if allocating these arrays results in significant slow-downs, or contributes significantly to memory fragmentation. If the current scheme does not give you any trouble, there is no reason to replace it.

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If you know that you need exactly 16 floats and it it is unlikely that this number will change, then you should use this:

struct MyClass
{
    ....
    float       myData[16];
};

There is nothing wrong in using this simple design. If the size of array should vary from one case to another, then it is better to use the following:

template <int _len_data>
struct MyClass
{
    ....
    float       myData[_len_data];
};

After that you can define variables, like:

MyClass<16> a1;
MyClass<64> a2;
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