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Can't mass-assign protected attributes: created_at(2i), created_at(3i), created_at(1i), created_at(4i), created_at(5i)

my code is below:

def new
  @subject = Subject.new(:name => 'default')
  @subject_count = Subject.count + 1
end

def create
  # Instantiate a new object using form parameters
  @subject = Subject.new(params[:subject])
  # Save the object
  if @subject.save
  # If save succeeds, redirect to the list action
    flash[:notice] = "Subject created."
    redirect_to(:action => 'list')
  else
  # If save fails, redisplay the form so user can fix problems
    @subject_count = Subject.count + 1
    render('new')

what is the problem?

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3 Answers 3

You can try this,
In your subject model add all attributes you used in your form such as,

class Subject < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name, :created_at
  ...
  ...
end
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Either set config.active_record.whitelist_attributes in application to false in application.rb (not recommended) or whitelist attributes in your model using attr_accessible as such attr_accessible :name, :etc...

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I have whitelist attributes to false in a legacy app that needs updating to rails 3.2, but I'm still getting this error –  bbozo Dec 19 '13 at 16:05

Make sure to whitelist the attributes sent via the controller in the Subject model as explained by Alex. You Subject model should look like:

class Subject < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :created_at
end

Why? Rails requires this recently (after a security problem on Github) to make sure a malicious user doesn't send unwanted attributes from the frontend. Suppose you have an :admin boolean field on a User class. Without the attr_accessible someone could add a new field in the form, something like <input type="checkbox" name="user[admin]" value="true" checked>, which would give him admin powers to your application.

Sidenote... you don't need to set the :created_at date from the HTML form, ActiveRecord will manage the :created_at and :updated_at automatically for you (unless you want to set it manually for some reason off course).

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