Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to pass an object prototype function call within an input keypress detection event handler but am not sure how to go about this. Any help would be greatly appreciated The code is given below :

function foo{};

foo.prototype.shout = function() {
  alert(shout);
}

foo.prototype.someOtherFunction = function (event) {
  var e = event || window.event,
      code = e.charCode || e.keyCode;

    if(code === 38) {
       foo.shout// This is what doesn't work - sorry for the confusion
    }
}

foo.prototype.applyKeypress = function (_input) {
  var self = this;
      _input.onkeypress = foo.someOtherFunction; // someOtherFunction applied here
}
share|improve this question
    
Your first source for helpful information would be your browser's console. – I Hate Lazy Sep 24 '12 at 2:35
    
Objects don't inherit from their own public prototype but from their constructor's prototype. It's referred to as the object's private [[Prototype]] property. – RobG Sep 24 '12 at 2:36
    
Also, I suspect code should be e.keyCode or e.which. – RobG Sep 24 '12 at 2:39
    
Remove the prototype, foo.shout = function, foo.someOtherFunction = function – timidboy Sep 24 '12 at 2:53

As stated seconds before my post - you didn't create the object

http://jsfiddle.net/Smzuu/2/

I changed your code a little so it would run. Small things you missed out when writing this example code, I hope

function foo(){};

foo.prototype.shout = function() {
  alert("hello"); //alert(shout); // shout was not defined.
}

var sampleInput = document.getElementById('sampleInputField');

sampleInput.onkeypress = function(e) {
    if(e.charCode === 97) { // A pressed
      new foo().shout(); 
    }
}​
share|improve this answer

No, it doesn't work because you haven't created an object:

function foo(){};

foo.prototype.shout = function() {
  alert(shout);
}

var o = new foo();

var sampleInput = document.getElementById('sampleInputField');

sampleInput.onkeypress = function(e) {
  if(code === 38) { //up arrow press
    o.shout() //now it works because it's an object, not a constructor
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Also need a shout variable, or some quotes around it. – I Hate Lazy Sep 24 '12 at 2:36
    
Thanks - very helpful. But what if you wanted to make the shout function accessible to any object that inherits from the parent instead of creating a new object then applying it? – neitony Sep 24 '12 at 2:37
    
@neitony: I'm not sure I can understand what "what if you wanted to make the shout function accessible to any object that inherits from the parent instead of creating a new object then applying it" means. You have declared foo class with one method shout() - so you can create any amount of objects you want now. – zerkms Sep 24 '12 at 2:38
    
Ok, so using your example, in order to use the shout function I had to create an instance of the object right? But what if I wanted to make it such that the shout method is already available when the object is created - I have adjusted the code sample above to give you a better idea. Thanks for your help – neitony Sep 24 '12 at 2:51
    
@neitony: the shout method is already available when the object is created - that is – zerkms Sep 24 '12 at 3:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.