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I want to see any variable (String var) value in my android program. You can say for debugging purpose.

When I am printing anything using, say System.out.print("Hello") Then I am unable find this output any where.

Do anyone have idea where to find this output.

Here is my code-

package com.test1.nus;

import android.os.Bundle;
import android.app.Activity;
import android.view.Menu;

public class MainActivity extends Activity {

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

        System.out.print("Hello");

        ....
     }
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your output will be logged to logcat

Assuming you are using eclipse:

Window > Show View ---> Logcat (If this not visible, select other--Android--Logcat)
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Nambari, I could not find my output string in my logcat. Don I need change any setting? – Vishal Sep 24 '12 at 4:09
    
No, I don't think you need to do any setting changes (except make sure no filters set in logcat window). If your code is being executed, you should see System.out statement. – Nambari Sep 24 '12 at 4:12

By default, the Android system redirects stdout (System.out) output to /dev/null, which means your messages are lost.

Instead, the common pattern to log debug strings in Android is the following

import android.util.Log;

Then at the top of your class YourClass

private static final String TAG = YourClass.class.getSimpleName();

And to log debug strings you need to call

Log.d(TAG, "your debug text here");

which in your case results in

package com.test1.nus;

import android.util.Log;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.app.Activity;
import android.view.Menu;

public class MainActivity extends Activity {

    private static final String TAG = MainActivity.class.getSimpleName();

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

        Log.d(TAG, "Hello");

        ....
    }

Finally you can see your debug strings in Eclipse via

Windows > Show view > Other and select LogCat

and if required filter by the tag of YourClass.

However, if you really need to see messages written by System.out.println you need to tell Android to route them to logcat via the following shell commands

$ adb shell stop
$ adb shell setprop log.redirect-stdio true
$ adb shell start

and then you will be able to see your debug messages in Eclipse via LogCat view and the tag stdout.

You can get more details from the official documentation here http://developer.android.com/tools/debugging/debugging-log.html

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See this link: http://www.droidnova.com/debugging-in-android-using-eclipse,541.html It will show some screen shots related to logcat. There you can find out your output message.

Follow this: http://developer.android.com/tools/help/logcat.html

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If you want to check your output in the android emulator use Toast messages.

The result with system.out.println("....") will be displayed in logcat.

To check in android emulator/device.just do like this

Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Hello", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
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I suggest you take a look at the android.util.log class. The Android developer pages has a good introduction for using it. (In fact, I just found this today since I'm learning Android programming myself.)

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Thanks. Its really helpful – Vishal Sep 24 '12 at 5:21
    
@rajivshah An upvote shows just how helpful ;-) – Code-Apprentice Sep 24 '12 at 5:24

If you use the AVD s that will give you a more interesting experience than just print in the log. Here they have described all those things perfectly.

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You are better off using Logs if it is for debugging purposes.

There are various methods available like Log.v() Log.d() Log.i() Log.w() and Log.e() for verbose, debug, info, warn and error logs respectively.

Then you can check the logcat while debugging the application.

For further reference, go here.

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