Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I realize that if I pass an object as a parameter of a function and do changes to it, the changes "stay" with the object. But it is not the case for an integer.

public void start() {
    int x = 100;
    modify(x);
    // I would like x to be 200 now. But it isn't :(
}

public void modify(int y) {
    y *= 2;
}

So basically, is there a way to achieve what I wanted in the code above? Is it possible to modify an integer like that (like an object reference)?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

While working with primitives there is no concept of "reference". But you may achieve what you want by doing something like below:

x = modify(x); may be code want.

Now x contains the results of modify(x) method invocation.

share|improve this answer
    
Not the code I need - but definitely the answer I required :) –  Voldemort Sep 24 '12 at 4:11
    
All primitives have object wrappings. So why not use Integer?? Integer x = new Integer(5); modify(x); –  Alex Calugarescu Sep 24 '12 at 4:46
    
@AlexCalugarescu: all wrapper classes are immutable. Even though it is allowed to do what you suggested, it is no more than extra overhead. –  Nambari Sep 24 '12 at 13:59

You cannot do that. Primitives are passed by value. (References are also passed by value. You can't modify an object reference; you can only modify the object that is referenced.) The best you can do is:

public void start() {
    int [] x = {100};
    modify(x);
    // x[0] is now 200 :)
}

public void modify(int []y) {
    y[0] *= 2;
}

The array reference x is passed by value, but you can modify the array elements. Note that passing an Integer won't help, because Integer objects are immutable.

Alternatively, you can redesign your method to return the doubled value and assign it in the calling code (as Nambari suggests).

share|improve this answer

A third possibility, beside passing an array or using a return value, would be to pass an object of some ValueHolder class with a getter and setter:

public class IntValueHolder
{
    private int value;
    public int getValue()
    {
        return this.value;
    }
    public void setValue(final int value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }
}

This is technically very similar to passing an array, but is IMHO a bit cleaner, i.e. it better describes your intent.

share|improve this answer

One thing you can do is get the return value of the modify() method and assign it to the variable as follows.

public void start() {
    int x = 100;
    x=modify(x);   
}

public int modify(int y) {
    return y *= 2;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
No need to use compound assignment in modify; just return y * 2;. Also, isn't this just Nambari's answer? –  Ted Hopp Sep 24 '12 at 4:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.