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Suppose I have the following snippets:

int compareFoo(std::string** a, std::string** b) {
    return (**a).compare(**b);
}

int main() {
    std::string** foo = new std::string*[3];
    foo[0] = new std::string("a");
    foo[1] = new std::string("c");
    foo[2] = new std::string("b");
    sort(foo,foo+3,compareFoo);
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        std::cout << *foo[i] << std::endl; // print acb
    }
}

If I'd left out the third parameter(compare) for sort, it'd have given me the sorted 3 strings in terms of their memory addresses, that's not how I intended it. But how do I parameterize the compareFoo function so that it won't compare the memory addresses.

void sort(RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last, Compare comp);

The description of Sort on cplusplus.com is quite vague and the given example is simple. Since it takes an Iterator, does it mean that i only work with stand containers? Thank you

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The comparison function takes two items to compare and returns true if the first one is less than the second one. In your case, it would work like this:

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

using std::sort;

bool compareFoo(std::string* a,std::string* b){
  return *a < *b;
}

int main(){
  std::string** foo = new std::string*[3];
  foo[0] = new std::string("a");
  foo[1] = new std::string("c");
  foo[2] = new std::string("b");
  sort(foo,foo+3,compareFoo);
  for(int i=0;i<3;i++){
    std::cout << *foo[i] << std::endl; 
  }

  // Remember to delete things that you dynamically allocate.
  delete foo[0];
  delete foo[1];
  delete foo[2];
  delete [] foo;
}
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what about the equal case? Does sort handle that? Thanks –  Cong Hui Sep 24 '12 at 7:29
    
@ClintHui: sort() uses less(a,b) for comparison. It knows that a==b if less(a,b) and less(b,a) are both false. –  Vaughn Cato Sep 24 '12 at 13:08

I'd reconsider whether all of this pointer manipulation is really what you want. This isn't Java or C#. In C++, you do not allocate from the free store ("the heap") by default. Just create your array automatically and store the strings directly. In other words, you'd end up with something like this:

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
int main(){
    std::string foo [] = {
        "a",
        "c",
        "b"
    };
    std::sort(foo, foo + 3);
    for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++){
        std::cout << foo[i] << '\n'; // print abc
    }
}

Compared to your version, this

  • Is faster
  • Uses less memory (no extra pointer overhead)
  • Doesn't leak memory
  • Is more readable to people familiar with C++
  • Removes any fears about possible null pointers
  • Requires less code
  • Works better with optimizing compilers
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Thanks for the detailed explanation. –  Cong Hui Sep 24 '12 at 6:19

std::sort takes in 3 things:

  1. A random access iterator representing the start
  2. A random access iterator representing the end
  3. A function that takes in two things and compares them to return their result

So this means it can work with anything that follows the random access iterator template. Namely pointers, so arrays should work just fine.

However with your current code, your dereferencing one level too far, try this

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

using std::sort;

bool compareFoo(std::string a,std::string b){
  return *a < *b; //note the difference
}

int main(){
  std::string* foo = new std::string[3];
  foo[0] = std::string("a");
  foo[1] = std::string("c");
  foo[2] = std::string("b");
  sort(foo,foo+3,compareFoo);
  for(int i=0;i<3;i++){
    std::cout << *foo[i] << std::endl;
  }
}

Note however that in this case we don't need to provide the compare function, the function will automatically use the < operator

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hmm, wonder why using (*a).compare(*b) would still return "acb", wouldn't (*a) be dereferenced a to the actually string, and invoke this overloaded version of compare? int compare ( const string& str ) const, shouldn't it return "abc" as well? Thanks –  Cong Hui Sep 24 '12 at 6:25
    
You're right, edited –  jozefg Sep 24 '12 at 12:34
    
you got rid of the pointer arguments std::string a,std::string b? Thanks –  Cong Hui Sep 24 '12 at 15:03
    
Yep since we just have an array to strings sort will handle dereferencing for us –  jozefg Sep 24 '12 at 15:40
    
hmm. then it won't even compile, obvious there was a mistype in arguments. Thanks –  Cong Hui Sep 24 '12 at 20:40
bool compareFoo(std::string * lhs, std::string * rhs)
{
    return *lhs < *rhs;
}

Since it takes an Iterator, does it mean that i only work with stand containers?

No. Iterator is a concept. A pointer meets the requirements of the iterator concept, and so it is an iterator.

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