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I need to extract records from a table, copy the data to a second table and then update the records in the first table to indicate that they have been copied across successfully.

My current SP code is this:

SELECT TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES.* FROM TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES 
INNER JOIN TBL_CAMPAIGNS
ON TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES.adds_ABMId = TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_AddressBook
WHERE TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 1

Now once the above is performed i need to insert this data into a second table called TBL_RECIPIENTS. Assume that the columns are simply named col_1, col_2, col_3 .... col_5 in TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES and that this is the same in TBL_RECIPIENTS.

Once this action is performed i need to update TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 2 Ideally this should only be for those records that have actually been updated(in case script gets stopped mid way through due to server crash etc)

Please let me know if you need anything clarifying.

Many Thanks!


Ive taken the advise kindly given below and come up with the working code below. Ive read tutorial which suggested adding try/catch to ensure rollback if any errors occurr. Is my code below adequate in this respect??

Any suggest would be gratefully received.

Thanks.

CREATE PROCEDURE web.SERVER_create_email_recipients
AS
BEGIN TRY
  --sets (n) campaigns ready for transfer of emails to mailing list
      UPDATE TOP(1) TBL_CAMPAIGNS
  SET TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 1
  WHERE TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 0

  --finds above marked campaigns, retreives addresses then copies them to     TBL_CAMPAIGNRECIPIENTS ready for auto mailout
  INSERT TBL_CAMPAIGNRECIPIENTS (recip_CampaignId, recip_Email, recip_Forename, recip_Surname, recip_adds_Key)
  SELECT C.Campaign_AddressBook, ABA.adds_Email, ABA.adds_RecipientForename,     ABA.adds_RecipientSurname, ABA.adds_Key
  FROM TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES ABA
  JOIN TBL_CAMPAIGNS C ON ABA.adds_ABMId = C.campaign_AddressBook
  WHERE C.campaign_Status = 1

  --checks that above emails have been copied across and then sets the campaigns status accordingly
  UPDATE C
  SET C.campaign_Status = 2
  From TBL_CAMPAIGNS C
  JOIN TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES  aba
  ON aba.adds_ABMId = C.campaign_AddressBook
  JOIN TBL_CAMPAIGNRECIPIENTS r on aba.adds_Key = r.recip_adds_Key
  WHERE C.campaign_Status = 1

END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
  -- Whoops, there was an error
  IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
     ROLLBACK

  -- Raise an error with the details of the exception
  DECLARE @ErrMsg nvarchar(4000), @ErrSeverity int
  SELECT @ErrMsg = ERROR_MESSAGE(),
         @ErrSeverity = ERROR_SEVERITY()

  --throws out error to logs?
  RAISERROR(@ErrMsg, @ErrSeverity, 1)
END CATCH
share|improve this question
    
Which database system are you using? Some DBMSes support non-standard ways of doing this that are nice. –  Harold L Aug 10 '09 at 16:37
    
SQL 2005 stored procedure. –  Munklefish Aug 10 '09 at 16:38
    
How does tbl_campaigns relate to tbl_recipients? Do I need to join through Tbl_AddressBookAddresses? –  HLGEM Aug 10 '09 at 16:50
    
SQL Server 2008 would have the MERGE statement which is designed for exactly this scenario - would allow you to simplify things quite a bit –  marc_s Aug 10 '09 at 20:36
    
Can anyone comment on this update please? –  Munklefish Aug 13 '09 at 11:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've made some guesses about your structure, the joins may not be correct

INSERT TBL_RECIPIENTS (Col1, Col2, COl3)
SELECT ABA.Col1, ABA.Col2,ABA.Col3
FROM TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES ABA
INNER JOIN TBL_CAMPAIGNS C ON ABA.adds_ABMId = C.campaign_AddressBook
WHERE TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 1

UPDATE C
SET C.campaign_Status = 2
From TBL_CAMPAIGNS C
JOIN TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES  aba
 on aba.adds_ABMId = C.campaign_AddressBook
JOIN TBL_RECIPIENTS r on aba.id = r.sameid
WHERE TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 1

Note I did not use select * which should never be used in production code. Also I used aliases to make the code easier to read.

share|improve this answer
    
CRuello is correct all this should be inside a transaction with a rollback if any part of it fails. –  HLGEM Aug 10 '09 at 16:54
    
You mean a try/catch block ? –  Munklefish Aug 12 '09 at 10:20
    
YOu can use a try catch block to handle the rollback process, but you still have to start witha begin tran statement and then make sure that you have paths in the code to commit the tran or rollback the tran. –  HLGEM Aug 12 '09 at 13:07

Have you considered to put it all inside a transaction?

Example: DECLARE @ErrorCode INT

BEGIN TRAN
  UPDATE Authors
  SET Phone = '911'
  WHERE au_id = 2

  SELECT @ErrorCode = @@ERROR
  IF (@intErrorCode <> 0) GOTO ErrExit

  DELETE Authors WHERE Phone = '911' au_id <> 2 

  SELECT @ErrorCode = @@ERROR
  IF @ErrorCode <> 0) GOTO ErrExit
COMMIT TRAN

ErrExit;
IF (@intErrorCode <> 0) 

ROLLBACK TRAN

If the update or the delete gives an error the transaction will be rolled back. If the system crashes before the commit the sql server does a rollback, because there is an uncommited transaction

share|improve this answer
    
Please clarify. –  Munklefish Aug 12 '09 at 10:07
    
Ive never dealt with transaction and have no idea what they are or how to do them. Please clarfiy your comment. –  Munklefish Aug 12 '09 at 10:12
    
Ive already added it with a Try/Catch block. Is this the same? The catch has a roll back in it although the try doesnt include a commit. IS this ok? –  Munklefish Aug 12 '09 at 11:41
    
No its not the same. The begin transaction starts a new transaction, until it is commited the changes you do is not visible to other database connections. When you begin a transaction you have to either commit it or roll it back this is VERY important to remember. –  CruelIO Aug 12 '09 at 12:30
    
So should i remove the try catch? Or place the BEGIN TRAN.....COMMIT TRAN within the TRY element of a TRY/CATCH? –  Munklefish Aug 12 '09 at 14:28

One way is to use the OUTPUT clause; in this case, you could select all address book ID's you've inserted, and use that to update the campaigns. Still, you'd really need to use transactions if you want to get this reliable, with a lock that will prevent both updates and inserts.

DECLARE @addressBookIds TABLE(AddressBookId INT NOT NULL)

INSERT INTO TBL_RECIPIENTS
OUTPUT INSERTED.adds_ABMId INTO @addressBookIds
SELECT TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES.* 
FROM   TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES
INNER JOIN TBL_CAMPAIGNS
  ON   TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES.adds_ABMId = TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_AddressBook
WHERE  TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 1

UPDATE TBL_CAMPAIGNS
SET [campaign_Status] = 2
FROM TBL_CAMPAIGNS
INNER JOIN @addressBookIds AS T
ON TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_AddressBook = T.AddressBookId
AND TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 1

If the campaign ID was part of TBL_RECIPIENTS table, you'd be 100% certain you've got the right campaign ID's through the OUTPUT clause and locking transactions would not really be required. As far as I can tell, SQL Server does not allow you to refer to columns from joined tables in the OUTPUT clause (unlike DELETE ... OUTPUT and UPDATE ... OUTPUT), so the campaign ID must be part of the INSERT's SELECT clause.

Because the campaign ID is not part of the output, this solution is pretty much a complicated version of HLGEM's answer, but it could be useful to you in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
Ive tried the code above but my SQL manager wont compile it due to the following error: "Insert Error: Column name or number of supplied values does not match table definition." In reality the column names between the tables are actually different. So im hoping its just a case of mapping the columns from one table to the next. Please can you show me how i update the INSERT block to cater for this. Assume col1 on table A is colA on table B for ease. Many Thanks!!! –  Munklefish Aug 12 '09 at 10:06
    
It's just what you'd normally do: INSERT INTO TBL_RECIPIENTS([colA], ...) OUTPUT INSERTED.adds_ABMId INTO @addressBookIds SELECT TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES.col1, ... You just sandwich the OUTPUT clause between the regular INSERT INTO and SELECT –  Ruben Aug 12 '09 at 14:30

You should store the updated address id into a table variable populated using the OUTPUT clause of INSERT:

create table TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES (
    adds_ABMID int identity(1,1) not null,
    col_1 varchar(100),
    col_2 varchar(100));
go

create table TBL_RECIPIENTS (
    adds_ABMID int not null,	
    col_1 varchar(100),
    col_2 varchar(100));
go

create table TBL_CAMPAIGNS (
    campaign_AddressBook int,
    campaign_Status int);
go

insert into TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES (col_1, col_2)
    values ('spam', 'is evil');
insert into TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES (col_1, col_2)
    values ('all mass mail', 'is spam');


insert into TBL_CAMPAIGNS (campaign_AddressBook, campaign_Status)
    values (1,1);
insert into TBL_CAMPAIGNS (campaign_AddressBook, campaign_Status)
    values (2,1);
go  

set nocount on;
declare @newRecipients table (adds_ABMID int);
begin transaction
insert into TBL_RECIPIENTS (adds_ABMID, col_1, col_2)
    output inserted.adds_ABMID into @newRecipients
    SELECT a.adds_ABMID
    	, a.col_1
    	, a.col_2
    FROM TBL_ADDRESSBOOKADDRESSES a 
    INNER JOIN TBL_CAMPAIGNS ON a.adds_ABMId = TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_AddressBook
    WHERE TBL_CAMPAIGNS.campaign_Status = 1
update TBL_CAMPAIGNS 
    set campaign_Status = 2
    from TBL_CAMPAIGNS as c
    join @newRecipients as new on c.campaign_AddressBook = new.adds_ABMID;
commit; 
go

select * from TBL_RECIPIENTS;
select * from TBL_CAMPAIGNS;
go
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time, but it doesnt make any sense to me without some sort of explanation of what is going on. –  Munklefish Aug 12 '09 at 10:01

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