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I have a class called Message which overloads these operators:

public static bool operator ==(Message left, Message right)
public static bool operator !=(Message left, Message right)

public static bool operator ==(Message left, string right)
public static bool operator !=(Message left, string right)

public static bool operator ==(string left, Message right)
public static bool operator !=(string left, Message right)

I want the == and != operators keep comparing references of the types other than String and Message but,

var message = new Message();
var isNull = message == null;

gives me this:

The call is ambiguous between the following methods or properties: 'Message.operator ==(Message, Message)' and 'Message.operator ==(Message, string)'

I know it's because both Message and String are reference types and they both can be null, but I want to be able to use == opreator for checking whether the message is null.

Can I overload == for null values? I tried overloading it for object and call object.ReferenceEquals(object, object) in the overload but that didn't help.

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3  
If you wan't to do it this way (which I do not recommend), you will have to cast null to one of the applicable types. message == (string)null; or message == (Message)null; should work. –  verdesmarald Sep 24 '12 at 7:03
    
@verdesmarald: Yes, that works but I was hoping to find a way for using it directly. What do you recommend btw? –  Şafak Gür Sep 24 '12 at 7:04
    
Nope, as far as I am aware you can't do that if you want to have multiple operator==s. –  verdesmarald Sep 24 '12 at 7:06
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Provide an implementation for operator ==(Message left, object right) and check the type of right to see whether it is null, a string or a Message.

Alternatively, define an implicit constructor for Message that takes a string. See Operator overloading and different types for an example.

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