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Given x number of arrays, each with a possibly different number of elements, how can I iterate through all combinations where I select one item from each array?

Example:

[   ]   [   ]   [   ]
 foo     cat      1
 bar     dog      2
 baz              3
                  4

Returns

[foo]   [cat]   [ 1 ]
[foo]   [cat]   [ 2 ]
  ...
[baz]   [dog]   [ 4 ]

I'm doing this in Perl, btw.

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1  
There's quite a lot on this topic on stackoverflow already; just search for "permutation". I didn't check if there was one for perl in particular. –  balpha Aug 10 '09 at 17:09
1  
"permutation" is the wrong thing to search for since this isn't a permutation. –  brian d foy Jul 5 '10 at 7:23

5 Answers 5

My Set::CrossProduct module does exactly what you want. Note that you aren't really looking for permutations, which is the ordering of the elements in a set. You're looking for the cross product, which is the combinations of elements from different sets.

My module gives you an iterator, so you don't create it all in memory. You create a new tuple only when you need it.

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+1 ... I had not seen your post when I cooked up my attempt at repeating the functionality of this module (I did not know it existed either). –  Sinan Ünür Aug 10 '09 at 18:52

A simple recursive solution for an arbitrary number of lists:

sub permute {
  my ($first_list, @remain) = @_;

  unless (defined($first_list)) {
    return []; # only possibility is the null set
  }

  my @accum;
  for my $elem (@$first_list) {
    push @accum, (map { [$elem, @$_] } permute(@remain));
  }

  return @accum;
}

A not-so-simple non-recursive solution for an arbitrary number of lists:

sub make_generator {
  my @lists = reverse @_;

  my @state = map { 0 } @lists;

  return sub {
    my $i = 0;

    return undef unless defined $state[0];

    while ($i < @lists) {
      $state[$i]++;
      last if $state[$i] < scalar @{$lists[$i]};
      $state[$i] = 0;
      $i++;
    }

    if ($i >= @state) {
      ## Sabotage things so we don't produce any more values
      $state[0] = undef;
      return undef;
    }

    my @out;
    for (0..$#state) {
      push @out, $lists[$_][$state[$_]];
    }

    return [reverse @out];
  };
}

my $gen = make_generator([qw/foo bar baz/], [qw/cat dog/], [1..4]);
while ($_ = $gen->()) {
  print join(", ", @$_), "\n";
}
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+1 very elegant, thanks for sharing –  dfa Aug 10 '09 at 17:17
    
Note that there's some unnecessary allocation here - it can be optimized a bit further. But this general approach is what you want :) –  bdonlan Aug 10 '09 at 17:25
3  
It's not really the approach that you want. Avoid recursion in Perl, and don't create the whole thing in memory. –  brian d foy Aug 10 '09 at 18:11
    
Non-recursive variant added :) –  bdonlan Aug 10 '09 at 18:27
1  
permute() has a bug. Every inner list contains an empty array ref at the end. –  FMc Aug 10 '09 at 18:59

There's one method I thought of first that uses a couple for loops and no recursion.

  1. find total number of permutations
  2. loop from 0 to total_permutations-1
  3. observe that, by taking the loop index modulus the number of elements in an array, you can get every permutations

Example:

Given A[3], B[2], C[3],

for (index = 0..totalpermutations) {
    print A[index % 3];
    print B[(index / 3) % 2];
    print C[(index / 6) % 3];
}

where of course a for loop can be substituted to loop over [A B C ...], and a small part can be memoized. Of course, recursion is neater, but this might be useful for languages in which recursion is severely limited by stack size.

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1  
I think it's the same as three nested loops, except with this approach you also spend time on doing the math in the process. –  Andrew Y Aug 10 '09 at 18:30
    
a triple for loop is far efficient and easy to read –  dfa Aug 10 '09 at 18:32
    
With a little work, this approach will work for any number of lists, which can't be said for nested for loops. –  barrycarter May 10 '14 at 1:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Recursive and more-fluent Perl examples (with commentary and documentation) for doing the Cartesian product can be found at http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=7366

Example:

sub cartesian {
    my @C = map { [ $_ ] } @{ shift @_ };

    foreach (@_) {
        my @A = @$_;

        @C = map { my $n = $_; map { [ $n, @$_ ] } @C } @A;
    }

    return @C;
}
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Here is something that seems to work for some definition of "work". It is very likely to be slower than the nested loops, but I have not done any measurement.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::Util qw( max );

my @arrays = (
    [ qw( foo bar baz) ],
    [ qw( cat dog ) ],
    [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ],
);

my $count = 1;
$count *= @{ $_ } for @arrays;

my $max = max map { scalar @{ $_} } @arrays;
my @generators = map { generate( $_, $max ) } @arrays;

my @output;

for ( 1 .. $count ) {
    print join($", map { $_->() } @generators), "\n";
}

sub generate {
    my @array = @{ shift @_ };
    my $max   = shift;
    my $index = 0;
    if ( $max == @array ) {
        return sub { $array[ $index++ % @array ] };
    }
    else {
        my $this = -1;
        return sub {
            unless ( ++$this < $max ) {
                $this = 0;
                $index += 1;
            }
            return $array[ $index % @array ];
        };
    }
}

Output:

C:\Temp> fgh
foo cat 1
foo cat 2
foo cat 3
foo cat 4
bar dog 1
bar dog 2
bar dog 3
bar dog 4
baz cat 1
baz cat 2
baz cat 3
baz cat 4
foo dog 1
foo dog 2
foo dog 3
foo dog 4
bar cat 1
bar cat 2
bar cat 3
bar cat 4
baz dog 1
baz dog 2
baz dog 3
baz dog 4
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