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I have the following code

for i in np.arange(10):
   f = open("file_"+str(i)+".dat",'w')
   for j in np.arange(100):
      f.write(str(func(i,j)))
      f.write("\n")
      print func(i,j)
   f.close()

Now, I can see the output on the terminal because of the print command but the files that it is creating are empty. It isn't able to write the output to the file. How can I do it?

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2  
This has nothing to do with scope. Can you show the code of func()? –  Daniel Roseman Sep 24 '12 at 8:24
2  
have you tried to print str(func(i,j)) ? –  devsnd Sep 24 '12 at 8:26
1  
You're missing an end parentheses in the line f.write(str(func(i,j)) - be sure to copy and paste your code correctly –  David Robinson Sep 24 '12 at 8:32
3  
But are you sure that func is actually returning a value, rather than printing it? –  Daniel Roseman Sep 24 '12 at 8:47
2  
OK, it was silly from me, actually func was taking some time to complete amd I didn't know that you could not view the contents before the file closed down. –  lovespeed Sep 24 '12 at 9:27

2 Answers 2

You may want to try:

for i in np.arange(10):
   with open("file_%i.dat" % i,'w') as f:
       for j in np.arange(100):
           val = func(i,j)
           f.write("%s\n" % val)
           print val
       f.flush()
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3  
The .flush() is not neccessary. It is done automatically when the output file is closed. The with causes closing the file. –  pepr Sep 24 '12 at 9:20
    
I'm quite aware the with.. closes the file. We're forcing a flush to check whether it improves the problem or not. –  Pierre GM Sep 24 '12 at 9:24
    
Yes. This was my main reason for the comment. When any file in any OS is closed, it is always flushed. This way, trying one more explicit flush is not going to help. The flush should basically be used when writing to stdout or the like (or redirected) file. The only reason in the case is to get the latest information from the write buffer to a display. –  pepr Sep 24 '12 at 9:31
    
ident 4 spaces more the f.flush(), and you will be able to read results in the file before the end of processing. –  MatthieuW Sep 24 '12 at 10:10

Try the following code. It both displays the value and writes it to the files:

import numpy as np

def func(i, j):
    return i + j/1000.0

for i in np.arange(10):
    f = open("file_"+str(i)+".dat",'w')
    for j in np.arange(100):
        f.write(str(func(i,j)))
        f.write("\n")
        print func(i,j)
    f.close()

My guess is that Daniel Roseman is right, and that the problem is hidden in your func.

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