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So I have main UI thread and there is a function that takes quite some time. So I want to show user something on the screen for that time, but I don't want to mve my function in to the thread because it neads some GUI communication.

so what I need is this

 Message msg;
 msg.wait("wait dude");
 //my code
 msg.dismis_wait();

Any ideas?

I tried putting my code into thread but there is a problem that at the end of code I need to change my view, and I cannot do that from thread.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use Toast like the other answers suggested.

You can also use a separate Thread if you have long running code, and use Handler to send message to the main Thread to do changes in the screen.

You can also use, an AsyncTask, this is an Android special Thread that lets you do changes in the view during running, this is done in the doInBackground method.

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that's actual the best answer, the asynctack did the trick. because of it's postexecute method, btw can i do that in thread? –  gabrjan Sep 24 '12 at 11:46
    
@gabrjan If I understand you correctly, yes you can do it with a regular Thread. You can use Handler, which is a mechanism for sending messages. That way, when you finish your thread execute, you can send a message with success or unsuccess signal and update the screen respectively. The message can be sent with sendEmptyMessage method, with a number that symbols operation ended successfully or not. –  Ofir A. Sep 24 '12 at 12:50

Message is not the one you want to use.

You should try with Toast Notifications.

Below an example from the documentation:

Context context = getApplicationContext();
CharSequence text = "Hello toast!";
int duration = Toast.LENGTH_SHORT;

Toast toast = Toast.makeText(context, text, duration);
toast.show();
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if i use toast there is a problem that at the start when i write Toast.makeText(Main.this, " Here you message ", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show(); is not showed until all code goes trough. I know that0s weird but that0s how it is :S so if i change view at the end it doesn't show at all :S –  gabrjan Sep 24 '12 at 10:29
    
Show toast message when accessing onCreate method for example. If you have long time process code, you should think about running it in the thread. –  hsz Sep 24 '12 at 10:32
    
i have a function that takes about 15 sec and for that time i want to show some stuf on screen... –  gabrjan Sep 24 '12 at 10:38
    
So maybe you are looking for ProgressDialog. –  hsz Sep 24 '12 at 11:12

Try using Count Down Timer. Here is the class:-

public class MyCount extends CountDownTimer{
    public MyCount(long millisInFuture, long countDownInterval) {
        super(millisInFuture, countDownInterval);
        }

    @Override
    public void onFinish() {
 // Dismiss message
     }

    @Override
    public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished) {

    }
}

and use this in onCreate or where you want to show message.

MyCount counter = new MyCount(15000,1000);
    counter.start();
// Show message

after starting Timer show your message an onFinish of CountDownTimer dismiss message. You can change the values at object creation time. The first value i.e. "15000" is the total time in millisecs and second value i.e. "1000" is time per tick in millisecs.

Hope this would help you.

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@gabrjan: Ofir A has suggested the correct solution for ur query. Never run the long/cpu intensive operations in the main thread. Use an AsyncTask/Thread to perform ur backend operation and use handler instance to post the ui updation. U can also go with runOnUiThread for updating ur UI.

 runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {

                      HERE U CAN WRITE UR UI UPDATION CODE.
                }
            });
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if you want a toast message you could do something like this:

for (int i=0; i < 2; i++){ Toast.makeText(yourclass.this, " Here you message ", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();}

For toast you can only choose to display it long or short but cant define a time. Im displaying here the same toast message twice and with that doubling the time i would like to show it.

Put your entire code inside a scheduleTaskExecutor. That one runs code in the background line by line. so you can show your toast message in the beginning. Here an example:

First declare

private ScheduledExecutorService scheduleTaskExecutor;



    scheduleTaskExecutor= Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(5);

    // This schedule a task to run every 10 seconds:

    scheduleTaskExecutor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
      public void run() {

            for (int i=0; i < 2; i++){ Toast.makeText(yourclass.this, " Here you message ", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();}

            try {                 

            // your code here                       


            } catch (IOException e) {                          
               e.printStackTrace();                           
            }                                     

     // If you need update UI, simply do this:
     //   runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
      //    public void run() {
            // update your UI component here.
        //    myTextView.setText("refreshed");
         // }
      //  });
      }
    }, 0, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

you can stop the thread with:

 scheduleTaskExecutor.shutdownNow();

You can also start it with a delay or run it only once or in other ways. Check the documentation on: http://developer.android.com/intl/ja/reference/java/util/concurrent/ScheduledExecutorService.html

share|improve this answer
    
if i use toast there is a problem that at the start when i write Toast.makeText(Main.this, " Here you message ", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show(); is not showed until all code goes trough. I know that0s weird but that0s how it is :S –  gabrjan Sep 24 '12 at 10:28
    
@Gabrjan: Put your entire code inside a scheduleTaskExecutor. That one runs code in the background line by line. so you can show your toast message in the beginning. see my edit above. –  SunnySonic Sep 24 '12 at 11:06

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