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I have a simple makefile that compiles a p.c file to an executable using gcc on Linux. The p.c file depends on a a.h file. My makefile looks like this:

//makefile
CC = gcc

build: p.c a.h
    $(CC) -o out p.c
clean:
    rm -f *.exe
rebuild: clean build
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2  
What's the invocation of make? –  Daniel Fischer Sep 24 '12 at 10:48
2  
One small point: make clean will not work as you are trying to delete a '.exe' file, and your executable has no such extension. –  Lee Netherton Sep 24 '12 at 10:51
    
'The p.c file depends on a a.h file' ... this is not true. out depends on a.h, as well as p.c, but your makefile doesn't say so. –  Jim Balter Sep 24 '12 at 10:53
1  
It doesn't matter what the invocation of make is ... no invocation will get the right result. –  Jim Balter Sep 24 '12 at 10:55
    
@LeeNetherton, so the only way to clean it is to specifically remove the executable file with it's name? –  learner Sep 24 '12 at 11:16
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your makefile doesn't produce the files it promises to produce, namely build, clean and rebuild. Since these targets are not files they should be marked as phony targets:

.PHONY: build clean rebuild

build target should be:

build : out

out : p.c a.h
    $(CC) -o $@ p.c
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what is the $@? –  learner Sep 24 '12 at 10:58
    
You don't need .PHONY unless you have files named build, clean, or rebuild laying around. –  Jim Balter Sep 24 '12 at 10:58
    
@learner: $@ –  Maxim Yegorushkin Sep 24 '12 at 11:01
    
@learner That refers to the target, in this case out; it just allows you to avoid explicit mention of it. It is more useful in better structured Makefiles, like out: a.h ... out: p.c ... $(CC) -o $@ $^ where the command to be executed doesn't depend on the names of files at all. –  Jim Balter Sep 24 '12 at 11:01
    
@JimBalter: I once debugged for an hour why my clean target didn't work. Turned out there was a file named clean and my clean target wasn't marked as .PHONY. Kind of makes one appreciate .PHONY. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Sep 24 '12 at 11:15
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This part

build: p.c a.h
    $(CC) -o out p.c

says "I'm compiling with $(CC) -o out p.c and the result will be a file named 'build'". Since you lied to make (this creates the out file instead), it will try building 'build' again.

There's a lesson for Makefile writers here: always use the $@ variable (denoting the target) to avoid this error:

out: p.c a.h
    $(CC) -o $@ p.c

For more advice, see Paul's Rules for Makefiles.

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Learner, here is an example of using a variable to store the name of the executable. This way you only need to specify it in one place at the start of your Makefile:

EXECUTABLE = out

.PHONY: build clean rebuild

build: $(EXECUTABLE)

$(EXECUTABLE): p.c a.h
    $(CC) -o $@ p.c

clean:
    rm -f $(EXECUTABLE)

rebuild: clean build

Normally you would also have your .c and .h files listed in variables too so that you can add/remove files from your build easily without having to search through your Makefile for all of the places that they are used.

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Makefiles have the general syntax:

target : dependencies
    commands to make target from dependencies

So your Makefile expects to make a file called build using the build : p.c a.h target. Since the commands don't actually make this file each time you call make it's having to redo the command.

(PS: Linux binaries don't have a .exe extension)

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If you want to avoid always recompiling the source, then your target should depend on the object file, not the source file:

target.exe : p.o
        $(CC) -o $@ $?; 

p.o: p.c a.h
        $(CC) -c $@ $?;

A typical makefile doesn't usually have an explicit rule per object file, nor does it usually list explicit dependencies between implementation and header files; you usually see an implicit rule like

%.o : %.c 
        $(CC) -c $(CFLAGS) $?;

(where $? indicates the list of prerequisites for that target) or, if your project is dead simple (one source file), you don't even need that; you can usually get away with

all: target target: target.o

assuming you have a file named target.c, the above will build target using the default compiler and CFLAGS options.

Likewise, a typical makefile (at least in my experience) doesn't explicitly list header dependencies; rather, it relies on a compiler option to generate those dependency lists automagically (for gcc, that option is -M). See here for an example.

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