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I am trying to solve a regression problem using gausspr function in kernlab. The input is standardized. but the output of predict(model, test.set) turns out to be a set of NaN values!

training set, X

M1 -0.3437191 -0.1755636 -0.1914969 -0.205308 -0.1595554
M2 -0.3437191 -0.1755636 -0.1914969 -0.205308 -0.1595554
M3 -0.3437191 -0.1755636 -0.1914969 -0.205308 -0.1595554
M4 -0.3437191 -0.1755636 -0.1914969 -0.205308 -0.1595554
M5 -0.3437191 -0.1755636 -0.1914969 -0.205308 -0.1595554

training output, Y is

Y = c(1,2,3,4,5)

test set, Z

T1   1.5530507 -0.2152377 -0.202634 -0.1460405 -0.1592964
T2   1.5530507 -0.2152377 -0.202634 -0.1460405 -0.1592964
T3 -0.3736244 -0.2152377 -0.202634 -0.1460405 -0.1592964
T4 -0.3736244 -0.2152377 -0.202634 -0.1460405 -0.1592964
T5 -0.3736244 -0.2152377 -0.202634 -0.1460405 -0.1592964

the code:

library(kernlab)
model <- gausspr(X,Y)
predict(model, Z)

Output is

> head(res14)
     [,1]
[1,]  NaN
[2,]  NaN
[3,]  NaN
[4,]  NaN
[5,]  NaN
[6,]  NaN

I am wondering why I am getting this output.

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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Sep 24 '12 at 10:54

This question came from our site for people interested in statistics, machine learning, data analysis, data mining, and data visualization.

    
I just noticed I had zero variance in my dataset ! that could a reason for such a behavioral ! – user702846 Sep 9 '12 at 12:35
2  
Please make your example reproducible... – Paul Hiemstra Sep 24 '12 at 11:28
    
what does [1,2,3,4,5] stands for here? and what is res14? – plannapus Sep 25 '12 at 9:24
    
it is just an arbitrary reposnce variable. 1, is the output of M1, 2 output of M2 and so on. – user702846 Sep 25 '12 at 13:45

So because, the input data has a set of zero variance columns, making the covarance matrix would be possible (can some one say why ?) and the final result would be NaN values.

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1  
Covariance matrix does not need to be positive definite (it has to be positive semi-definite however, but just not full rank), it's when you need to invert the covariance matrix (to get the precision matrix) that you are in trouble. – Yanshuai Cao Sep 25 '12 at 14:06

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