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I just had a question in my mind that I want to figure out.

In C syntax, example of data types might be a char or int or float or double or BOOL (which is just an int right?)

Well, I was just wondering. How are these data types stored/defined. You have no access to find out, it is not a class.

How did programmers program these data types, so that they can be recognized as an integer or as a character?

How are they stored?

I just wanted to ask this question because it has been bothering me for a while!

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I suggest you try to find an old (like late 1980's to early 1990's) book about the C programming language. They often describe how the CPU works and how data is stored in memory. – Joachim Pileborg Sep 24 '12 at 11:10
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@HotLicks In almost all cases they are not even close, unless it's minor details like how simple variables are stored in memory. – Joachim Pileborg Sep 24 '12 at 11:15
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'How are these data types stored/defined.' -- Check your language manual. 'it is not a class' -- right, they are "primitive" types that generally are handled efficiently by the hardware. 'How did programmers program these data types, so that they can be recognized as an integer or as a character?' -- You need to clarify this question ... it seems to be based on some misconception. – Jim Balter Sep 24 '12 at 11:15
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@JoachimPileborg I believe that @ HotLicks' point was that Objective-C is a thin layer on top of C and that primitive types are shared among the object-oriented flavors of C – NSBum Sep 24 '12 at 11:24
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The only special case in your list of data types is BOOL, which is typedef'd in "objc/objc.h" as signed char, so it is not an int. – Martin R Sep 24 '12 at 11:28

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