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I have a file and i want to print ou the contents of it but the compiler does not recognize the following: "/ . \ ____ \ \ _ -. " //"/ /__ - /__\_\_\ \" "\ /\ _ \ . /___////" "//_/ \ \ _\ \ - __ " " _ \ __/ - /\ " " \ -.\ \ \ /__/ ." "\ \ _\ \ -. \ _ " "- \ ___\_\ `__\_\ " ". /___/// ///_/ "

Here is my code:

int main()
{
  MenuText text;
  string test = "Champion";
  ofstream output("File.txt");
  text.save(output);
  fstream output ("File.txt");
  text.load("File.txt");//This is an error.
  text.print();


MenuText::MenuText()
{
    mText = "Default";

}
MenuText :: MenuText(string text)
{
mText = text;
}
void MenuText::print()
{
cout<< "Story= " << mText<< endl;
cout<< endl;
}
void MenuText::save(ofstream& outFile)
{
outFile<<   "/         .   \  \____    \\   \\    _ -. "
            //"/    /__        -    \/\_______\\__\\__\ \"
            "__\  /\   __   \     .      \/_______//__//"
            "__/\/__/ \  \   \_\  \       -   ________  "
            "___    ___  ______  \  \_____/     -  /\    "
            "__    \\   -.\    \\   ___\ \/_____/    ."
            "\  \  \__\   \\   \-.      \\   __\_        "
            "-   \ _\_______\\__\  `\___\\_____\           "
            ".     \/_______//__/    /___//_____/ "<< mText<< endl;
cout<< endl;
outFile<< endl;
}
void MenuText::load(ifstream& inFile)
{
string garbage;
inFile>> garbage >> mText;
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by tenfour, Bo Persson, BЈовић, jogojapan, Evgeny Kluev Dec 10 '12 at 12:32

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
All literal (single) backslashes '\' in the text have to be written as '\\'. – rubber boots Sep 24 '12 at 11:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to escape occurences of \ as \\. Where you want two of them you need to escape both - \\\\.

Also note that the second line is commented out:

//"/    /__        -    \/\_______\\__\\__\ \"

What about:

        "/         .   \\  \\____    \\\\   \\\\    _ -. "
        "/    /__        -    \\/\\_______\\\\__\\\\__\\ \\"
        "__\\  /\\   __   \\     .      \\/_______//__//"
        "__/\\/__/ \\  \\   \\_\\  \\       -   ________  "
        "___    ___  ______  \\  \\_____/     -  /\\    "
        "__    \\\\   -.\\    \\\\   ___\\ \\/_____/    ."
        "\\  \\  \\__\\   \\\\   \\-.      \\\\   __\\_        "
        "-   \\ _\\_______\\\\__\\  `\\___\\\\_____\\           "
        ".     \\/_______//__/    /___//_____/ ";
share|improve this answer
    
yeah for some reason the second line has an error about missing a close quote :S – Pendo826 Sep 24 '12 at 11:26
    
The output just comes out as . ...... But that got rid of the error. – Pendo826 Sep 24 '12 at 11:28
    
Also: when your data looks like this, don't put it in the source as a string literal if you can possibly help it. There is no way for somebody looking at this source to judge whether it's what you intended, or whether some extra backslashes crept in somewhere. Better would be to build the string out of smaller parts that aren't gibberish, or to define the gibberish in a text file without escaping and process the text file as part of the build (either as a resource, or write a script to do the string-escaping for you). – Steve Jessop Sep 24 '12 at 12:04

\ is the escape character in a literal string. If you want to represent a backslash you need to apply it twice for each occurance:

\ => \\
\\ => \\\\

" characters inside a literal string also needs to be escaped \".

share|improve this answer

The compiler treats any \<any_symbol> pair as a control character, for example \n is a new line, and \t is tabulation. Thus every time you use the backslash, the compiler will try to interpret it, and the next symbol as a control character.

To avoid this, you must escape each backslash with another backslash, so every time you want to use \, you will need to replace it with \\. Of course, if you want to use more than one backslash, you will need to escape every one of them.

share|improve this answer

Supposedly "does not recognize" means something along the lines of "replaces some characters" or it conplains about illegal escape sequences: the backslash \ is a prefix for certain special character. You neither need to escape it as \\ or, with C++ 2011, you could use a raw string. For example, "\\" abd R"(\)" should both produce a single backslash.

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