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given:

#include <stdio.h>

class A
{
  friend class B;
 private:
  void func();
} GlobalA;

void A::func()
{
  printf("A::func()");
}

class B
{
 public:
  void func();
};

void B::func()
{
  GlobalA.func();
}

int main()
{
  B b;
  b.func();
  getchar();
}

so really all B::func() does is call A::func(), is there a better way to do this? Or does the compiler just call A::func() directly when it compiles.

CONSTRAINTS: class A creates threads and is used by multiple other classes. it is a global IO class to manage sockets/pipes, so i dont believe any type of inheritance would go over well.

NOTE: If this is a google-able problem please let me know as i did not what to search.

share|improve this question
    
Look at the dissasembly, it could be inlined, yes. – Luchian Grigore Sep 24 '12 at 12:53
3  
Please fix the formatting of this post by indenting everything properly. Don't use tabs. This is very tiresome to read. – Kerrek SB Sep 24 '12 at 12:54
    
Indent without tabs? – Lauer Sep 24 '12 at 12:59
    
@user1204406: I usually type three spaces for indenting in the web. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 25 '12 at 0:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Check out the generated assembly from your compiler (I used GCC 4.7 -O3):

For A::func()

_ZN1A4funcEv:
.LFB31:
    .cfi_startproc
    subl    $28, %esp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 32
    movl    $.LC0, 4(%esp)
    movl    $1, (%esp)
    call    __printf_chk
    addl    $28, %esp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 4
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

And B::func():

_ZN1B4funcEv:
.LFB32:
    .cfi_startproc
    subl    $28, %esp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 32
    movl    $.LC0, 4(%esp)
    movl    $1, (%esp)
    call    __printf_chk
    addl    $28, %esp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 4
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

They're identical - the compiler has done the smart thing for you for free behind the scenes. In this case your example was all in the same translation unit which makes it trivial for the compiler to decide if it's worth doing like that. (There are cases where it wouldn't be worth it most likely and the compiler will have a pretty good set of heuristics to help it figure out what's best for any given target).

If they were in different translation units it becomes quite a lot harder to do. Some compilers will still manage the same optimisations but not all. You can of course ensure that it remains within the same translation unit for every case by defining functions like these as inline which lets you specify them in the header files.

The moral of the story is don't sweat over tiny details - writing code that makes sense and is maintainable is far more important.

share|improve this answer
    
depends on the compiler of course. Although I think it is safe to say that any descent compiler would inline in such a trivial case. – log0 Sep 24 '12 at 13:06

In fact B.func() does something more subtle:

It does not call A::func but GlobalA.func() , GlobalA is an instance of class A.

So here GlobalA is a singleton (but expressed in a very "raw" way of single global instance)

So wathever number of B instances you would create, they'll always call the same A instance (GlobalA).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being the only one to spot the potential error. – juanchopanza Sep 24 '12 at 13:06
    
i dont see how that answers the question – Lauer Sep 24 '12 at 13:08
    
I answered the question by spotting some error in the analysis that led to the question itself .B::func does not call A::func but GlobalA.func, that is a BIG difference that should help you refining your analysis – dweeves Sep 24 '12 at 13:12

This is a common pattern: namely a bridge. From my experience it is always inlined (g++ since version 4.3 at least).

See Flexo's answer, the call to A member function is indeed inlined in the sample code you posted.

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