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The problem is that I have an Array of Byte with 200 Indexes and just want to check that is the Fourth bit of MyArray[75] is Zero(0) or One(1).

byte[] MyArray; //with 200 elements

//check the fourth BIT of  MyArray[75]
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What do you mean by "the fourth bit?" Bit 3 or bit 4? –  Nosredna Aug 10 '09 at 18:55
2  
I mean 00001000 –  mammadalius Aug 10 '09 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The fourth bit in element 75?

if((MyArray[75] & 8) > 0) // bit is on
else // bit is off

The & operator allows you to use a value as a mask.

xxxxxxxx = ?
00001000 = 8 &
----------------
0000?000 = 0 | 8

You can use this method to gather any of the bit values using the same technique.

1   = 00000001
2   = 00000010
4   = 00000100
8   = 00001000
16  = 00010000
32  = 00100000
64  = 01000000
128 = 10000000
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Actually 8 would be the 3rd bit –  Henk Holterman Aug 10 '09 at 18:51
    
bit 3 is the fourth bit :) (bit 0 is the first bit) –  ssg Aug 10 '09 at 18:53
    
Well, that all depends on what he means by the "fourth bit," doesn't it? :-) –  Nosredna Aug 10 '09 at 18:53
1  
No, 8 is the fourth bit from the least significant end. Or the fifth, if you want to count from the most significant end. –  Jason Williams Aug 10 '09 at 18:54
1  
Given that he's asking this question it's a pretty safe assumption that he's not using the term zeroth bit. Either way, I think he'll have enough information to figure out the answer to his question. ;) –  Spencer Ruport Aug 10 '09 at 19:01

Something like:

if ( (MyArray[75] & (1 << 3)) != 0)
{
   // it was a 1
}

Assuming you meant 4th bit from the right.

And you might want to check out System.Collections.BitArray, just to be sure you're not reinventing the wheel.

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Or maybe 1<<3, depending on what he meant by 4th bit. –  Nosredna Aug 10 '09 at 18:54
    
Already caught that (off-by-)one –  Henk Holterman Aug 10 '09 at 18:57
    
+1 for mention of BitArray –  Phil Devaney Aug 10 '09 at 22:19
    private bool BitCheck(byte b, int pos)
    {
        return (b & (1 << (pos-1))) > 0;
    }
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2  
You keep using that ^ operator. I do not think it means what you think it means. –  Tyler McHenry Aug 10 '09 at 18:57
    
^ is bitwise exclusive-or not power –  pjp Aug 10 '09 at 19:00
    
You are correct. My bad. Math.Pow() instead. –  Tank Aug 10 '09 at 19:00
    
I think what Tyler means is you might be looking for the 1 << (pos-1) statement for 1-indexed positions, or the 1 << pos statement for 0-indexed positions –  maxwellb Aug 10 '09 at 19:00
    
I made mpbloch's substitution and canceled the down vote. Tank seems to be new here so I thought I'd take the liberty. –  Nosredna Aug 10 '09 at 19:09

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