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I want to check the (numeric) input against a list of ranges (min,max) while the input is partially typed in; in other words, I need an elegant algorithm to check the prefix of a number against a range (without using regular expressions).

Sample testcases:

 1 is in (  5,   9) -> false
 6 is in (  5,   9) -> true
 1 is in (  5,  11) -> true  (as 10 and 11 are in the range)
 1 is in (  5, 200) -> true  (as e.g. 12 and 135 are in the range)
11 is in (  5,  12) -> true
13 is in (  5,  12) -> false 
13 is in (  5,  22) -> true
13 is in (  5, 200) -> true  (as 130 is in the range)
 2 is in (100, 300) -> true  (as 200 is in the range)

Do you have any idea?

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1  
Read the number and use operators <, >, <=, >=? –  Kiril Kirov Sep 24 '12 at 13:40
2  
What have you tried, and where are you stuck? Also, are you asking about C or C++ (the answer will be different, depending upon the required language.) –  Robᵩ Sep 24 '12 at 13:42
2  
@BenVoigt Right, I missed the "while the input is typed" part. –  jrok Sep 24 '12 at 13:55
2  
Does it have to be prefix? Would 2 in range(11, 13) return True? –  japreiss Sep 24 '12 at 14:10
1  
is it safe to no negative numbers are allowed? –  frankc Sep 24 '12 at 14:15

15 Answers 15

I believe it's true that the input is acceptable if and only if either:

  • It is a prefix substring of the lower bound converted to string

or

  • The input followed by any number of additional zeros (possibly none) falls into the range

The first rule is required by e.g. 13 is in range (135, 140). The second rule is required by e.g. 2 is in range (1000, 3000).

The second rule can be efficiently tested by a series of multiplies by 10, until the scaled input exceeds the upper bound.

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1  
I believe it's rather "The input followed by additional digits falls into the range". At least I think it would make more sense. –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 24 '12 at 13:47
2  
@SingerOfTheFall: Nope, I claim it's only necessary to test with trailing zeros in the second rule. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 13:48
1  
@Singer: But because 10 is in range, you're done testing, you already know the result is true. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 13:50
11  
These rules don't cover the case "8 is in (7, 12)". "8" is not a prefix of the lower bound, and "80" is outside the range. The second rule must be "The input followed by zero or more additional zeros falls into the range" –  Robᵩ Sep 24 '12 at 14:15
1  
@Rob: Umm, yes, any number of additional zeros can be zero additional zeros. I'll clarify. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:24

An iterative formulation:

bool in_range(int input, int min, int max)
{
  if (input <= 0)
    return true;    // FIXME handle negative and zero-prefixed numbers
  int multiplier = 1;
  while ((input + 1) * multiplier - 1 < min)         // min <= [input]999
    multiplier *= 10;    // TODO consider overflow
  return input * multiplier <= max;                  //        [input]000 <= max
}

A simpler [edit: and more efficent; see below] method is to use truncating integer division:

bool in_range(int input, int min, int max)
{
  if (input <= 0)
    return true;
  while (input < min) {
    min /= 10;
    max /= 10;
  }
  return input <= max;
}

Testing and profiling:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

bool ecatmur_in_range_mul(int input, int min, int max)
{
  int multiplier = 1;
  while ((input + 1) * multiplier - 1 < min)         // min <= [input]999
    multiplier *= 10;    // TODO consider overflow
  return input * multiplier <= max;                  //        [input]000 <= max
}

bool ecatmur_in_range_div(int input, int min, int max)
{
  while (input < min) {
    min /= 10;
    max /= 10;
  }
  return input <= max;
}

bool t12_isInRange(int input, int min, int max)
{
    int multiplier = 1;
    while(input*multiplier <= max)
    {
        if(input >= min / multiplier) return true;
        multiplier *= 10;
    }
    return false;
}

struct algo { bool (*fn)(int, int, int); const char *name; } algos[] = {
{ ecatmur_in_range_mul, "ecatmur_in_range_mul"},
{ ecatmur_in_range_div, "ecatmur_in_range_div"},
{ t12_isInRange, "t12_isInRange"},
};

struct test { int input, min, max; bool result; } tests[] = {
{  1,   5,   9, false },
{  6,   5,   9, true },
{  1,   5,  11, true }, // as 10 and 11 are in the range
{  1,   5, 200, true }, // as e.g. 12 and 135 are in the range
{ 11,   5,  12, true },
{ 13,   5,  12, false },
{ 13,   5,  22, true },
{ 13,   5, 200, true }, // as 130 is in the range
{  2, 100, 300, true }, // as 200 is in the range
{ 13, 135, 140, true }, // Ben Voigt
{ 13, 136, 138, true }, // MSalters
};
int main() {
    for (auto a: algos)
        for (auto t: tests)
            if (a.fn(t.input, t.min, t.max) != t.result)
                std::cout << a.name << "(" << t.input << ", " << t.min << ", " << t.max << ") != "
                    << t.result << "\n";

    for (auto a: algos) {
        std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> start = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
        for (auto t: tests)
            for (int i = 1; i < t.max * 2; ++i)
                for (volatile int j = 0; j < 1000; ++j) {
                    volatile bool r = a.fn(i, t.min, t.max);
                    (void) r;
                }
        std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> end = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
        std::cout << a.name << ": "
            << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(end - start).count() << '\n';
    }
}

Surprisingly (at least to me) iterated division comes out fastest:

ecatmur_in_range_mul: 17331000
ecatmur_in_range_div: 14711000
t12_isInRange: 15646000
share|improve this answer
    
Already proposed and still fails to check 13 in (135, 140). –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:27
    
@BenVoigt fixed (at least for that case). –  ecatmur Sep 24 '12 at 14:33
    
I like your new solution, the first solution still looks very wrong. See MSalters comment on T_12 answer. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:40
    
@BenVoigt for (13, 136, 138) the first solution loop stops at multiplier = 10 because (13 + 1) * 10 - 1 = 139 >= 136; then 13 * 10 <= 138 so it returns true. –  ecatmur Sep 24 '12 at 14:51
    
Oh ok. Yeah that variation does appear to fix it. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:54
bool isInRange(int input, int min, int max)
{
    int multiplier = 1;
    while(input*multiplier <= max)
    {
        if(input >= min / multiplier) return true;
        multiplier *= 10;
    }
    return false;
}

It pass all your testcases.

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1  
Fails for 13 in (135, 140). –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 13:49
    
Adding input +=9.would fix that testcase, but break in (136, 138). You really need a bunch of testcases. –  MSalters Sep 24 '12 at 13:59
    
@BenVoigt, fixed –  tsionyx Sep 24 '12 at 14:28
    
Yup. This is now the numerical version of Ben Voights answer. The input*multiplier <= max part is equivalent to the "add zeroes" rule; the input >= min / multiplier part is equivalent to the "prefix substring of lowerbound" rule. –  MSalters Sep 24 '12 at 14:50
    
@MSalters: Not exactly, the "prefix substring" rule is equivalent to input == min / multiplier, not >=, and, of course, Ben Voight 's rules are alternative (OR), but mine rules are AND –  tsionyx Sep 24 '12 at 14:54

One trivial solution is to generate all N-digit prefixes in range. So, for 11 is in ( 5, 12) you want the two-digit prefixes of all numbers between 5 and 12. Obviously that's just 10, 11 and 12.

In general, for numbers X to Y, the possible N-digit prefixes can be obtained by the following algorithm:

X = MIN(X, 10^(N-1) ) ' 9 has no 2-digit prefix so start at 10
Y = Y - (Y MOD 10^N)  ' 1421 has the same 2 digit prefix as 1400
WHILE (X < Y)
  LIST_PREFIX += PREFIX(N, X) ' Add the prefix of X to the list.
  X += 10^(TRUNCATE(LOG10(X)) - N+1) ' For N=2, go from 1200 to 1300
share|improve this answer
    
Not elegant nor efficient. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:25
    
Agreed on not elegant, but why is it not efficient? –  MSalters Sep 24 '12 at 14:29
    
Oh wait, I misread it as enumerating all numbers starting with the input. How do you handle the range (5, 12000)? –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:34
    
With prefix 87? N=2, so minimum is 10, maximum is 12000. Add prefix 10, step +1 up to 99. From there, +10 to 999, +100 to 9999, +1000 to 11999. Since the step size depends on the prefix length needed, for numbers N+M with digits it samples only 1 in M numbers and still gets all prefixes of length N –  MSalters Sep 24 '12 at 14:41
    
Well, there's the "not very efficient". You've got a list of several hundred values, but only about half a dozen tests were needed. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:44

Given a value n, begin with the half-open range [n, n + 1) and proceed by orders of magnitude:

  • [10n, 10(n + 1))
  • [100n, 100(n + 1))
  • [1000n, 1000(n + 1))

Continue until the iterated range overlaps the target range, or the two ranges can no longer overlap.

#include <iostream>

bool overlaps(int a, int b, int c, int d) {
  return a < c && c < b || c < a && a < d;
}

bool intersects(int first, int begin, int end) {
  int last = first + 1;
  ++end;
  while (first <= end) {
    if (overlaps(first, last, begin, end))
      return true;
    first *= 10;
    last *= 10;
  }
  return false;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  std::cout << std::boolalpha
    << intersects( 1,   5,   9) << '\n'
    << intersects( 6,   5,   9) << '\n'
    << intersects( 1,   5,  11) << '\n'
    << intersects( 1,   5, 200) << '\n'
    << intersects(11,   5,  12) << '\n'
    << intersects(13,   5,  12) << '\n'
    << intersects(13,   5,  22) << '\n'
    << intersects(13,   5, 200) << '\n'
    << intersects( 2, 100, 300) << '\n'
    << intersects(13, 135, 140) << '\n';
}

Using ranges is necessary to prevent missed cases. Consider n = 2 and a target range of [21, 199]. 2 is not in the range, so we multiply by 10; 20 is not in the range, so we multiply by 10 again; 200 is not in the range, nor any higher number, so the naive algorithm terminates with a false negative.

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Using ranges is not necessary. My first rule avoids your example of a false negative. –  Ben Voigt Sep 25 '12 at 0:15

I prefer an approach which uses already implemented algorithms. While a lot of other solution use recursive divisions by 10, I think it's better to make use of 10-base logarithms, which have O(1) complexity, so that the whole solution complexity is O(1).

Let us split the problem into two parts.

First part will handle the case when the number * 10^n is between min and max for at least one n. This would let us check for example if number = 12 and min,max = 11225,13355, that x = 12000 = 12*10^3 is between min and max. If this test checks out, it means the result is True.

Second part will handle the cases when number is beginning of either min or max. For example if number = 12 and min,max = 12325,14555, the first test will fail, as 12000 is not between min and max (as well as will fail all other numbers 12*10^n for any n). But second test will find that 12 is the beginning of 12325 and return True.

First

Let's check, if the first x = number*10^n, which is equal or larger than min, is smaller or equal than max (so min <= x <= max, where x is number*10^n for any integer n). If it's bigger than max, than all other xes will be bigger, as we took the smallest.

log(number*10^n) > log(min)
log(number) + log(10^n) > log(min)
log(number) + n > log(min)
n > log(min) - log(number)
n > log(min/number)

To get the number to compare with, we just calculate the first satisfactory n:

n = ceil(log(min/number))

And calculate then number x:

x = number*10^n

Second

We should check if our number is a literal beginning of either boundary.

We just calculate x beginning with the same digits as number and padded with 0s on the end, having the same length as min:

magnitude = 10**(floor(log10(min)) - floor(log10(number)))
x = num*magnitude

And then check if min's and x difference (in magnitude scale) is less than 1 and bigger or equal to 0:

0 <= (min-x)/magnitude < 1

So, if number is 121 and min is 132125, then magnitude is 1000, x = number*magnitude would be 121000. min - x gives 132125-121000 = 11125, which should be smaller than 1000 (otherwise min beginning would be bigger than 121), so we compare it with magnitude by dividing by it's value and comparing to 1. And it's OK if min is 121000, but not OK if min is 122000, that is why 0 <= and < 1.

The same algorithm is for max.

Pseudo code

Incorporating it all in pseudo code gives this algorithm:

def check(num,min,max):
    # num*10^n is between min and max
    #-------------------------------
    x = num*10**(ceil(log10(min/num)))
    if x>=min and x<=max: 
        return True

    # if num is prefix substring of min
    #-------------------------------
    magnitude = 10**(floor(log10(min)) - floor(log10(num)))
    if 0 <= (min-num*magnitude)/magnitude < 1:
        return True

    # if num is prefix substring of max
    #-------------------------------
    magnitude = 10**(floor(log10(max)) - floor(log10(num)))
    if 0 <= (max-num*magnitude)/magnitude < 1:
        return True

    return False

This code could be optimized by avoiding repeated calculations of log10(num). Also, in final solution I would go from float to integer scope (magnitude = 10**int(floor(log10(max)) - floor(log10(num)))) and then perform all comparisons without division, i.e. 0 <= (max-num*magnitude)/magnitude < 1 -> 0 <= max-num*magnitude < magnitude. This would alleviate possibilities of round-off errors.

Also, it may be possible to replace magnitude = 10**(floor(log10(min)) - floor(log10(num))) with magnitude = 10**(floor(log10(min/num))), where log10 is calculated only once. But I can't prove that it will always bring correct results, nor can I disprove it. If anybody could prove it, I would be very grateful.

Tests (in Python): http://ideone.com/N5R2j (you could edit input to add another tests).

share|improve this answer
    
Same bug on 13,135,140: ideone.com/wxddn –  MSalters Sep 24 '12 at 15:06
    
@MSalters This means that I didn't grasped what is needed. Because I tested on the tests provided in the question. –  ovgolovin Sep 24 '12 at 15:07
    
@MSalters Updated to reflect the bug. –  ovgolovin Sep 24 '12 at 15:39

I came to this new simple solution while thinking on a proof for @Ben Voigt 's beautiful solution:

Let's go back to elementary school where we did number comparison. Question would be like: check if the number "A" is in the range of number "B" and number "C"

Solution: Adding the necessary Zeros to the left side of numbers (so we have equal number of digits in all numbers) We start from the leftmost digit. compare it with the equivalent digit in the other two numbers.

  • if the digit from A is less than the digit from B or more than the digit from C, then A is not in the range.

  • if not we repeat the process with the next digit from A and equivalents from B and C.

IMPORTANT QUESTION: Why don't we stop right there? Why do we check the next digits?

IMPORTANT ANSWER: Because the digit from A being between the equivalents from B and C is O.K. up to now but not enough reason yet to make a decision! (obvious right?)

This, in turn, means there could be a set of digits which could put A out of the range.

AND, LIKEWISE

There could be a set of digits which could put A inside the range

which is another way of saying A could be a prefix of a number in the range.

Isn't that what we were looking for?! :D

The backbone of the algorithm would be basically a simple comparison for each input event:

  1. Add some zero (if necessary) at the left of min so that the length of min and max would become equal.
  2. compare input A with the equivalent digits from min and max (cut the corresponding digits of min and max from left, and not right)
  3. Is input A <= corresponding part of max AND >= corresponding part of min? (no: return false, yes: return true)

false and true here express the situation "up to now", as the problem requires.

share|improve this answer
    
How can I call everyone for a feedback? I would love to see some feedback. This is my first activity in stackoverflow.com and I don't know my way around this place much. @Ben Voigt What is your opinion on this solution? –  Hossein Sep 24 '12 at 19:50
    
Edited the post: Added the "Adding Zero to the left side of numbers" and edited the post based on that. –  Hossein Sep 24 '12 at 20:19
    
I think I'm having serious problem with my description. Tried putting the post under extensive editing. Sorry, my bad. But I think I have managed to deliver the overall sense of the solution. Any feedback would be highly appreciated. –  Hossein Sep 24 '12 at 20:35
1  
I think you might have problems with 25 in (290, 310) since 2 is between (2,3) and 5 is between (1,9), but 25 is not a prefix for any number in range. As well, 39 in (2500, 4700), the 9 is not in the range (5,7). So you need to be careful about earlier digit was the same as the digit in min vs earlier digit is greater than the corresponding digit in min`*. I guess that's what your step 5 and 6 do? –  Ben Voigt Sep 25 '12 at 0:13
    
@BenVoigt You were right. I changed the algorithm so that it takes into account, the earlier digits to so in your first case, now, 25 would be compared against (29,31) and not 5 against (1,9). This solves the problem you mentioned and surprisingly simplifies the whole algorithm. I also changed the algorithm so that it should get called with each input digit. By golly, it's just come down to simple comparison! The whole point of this solution is in the IMPORTANT QUESTION and it's IMPORTANT ANSWER which proves the validity of the simple solution. –  Hossein Sep 25 '12 at 7:26
(input >= lower_bound) && input <= upper_bound

OR

(f(input) >= lower_bound) && (f(input) <= upper_bound)

OR

(lower_bound - f(input) < pow(10, n_digits_upper_bound - n_digits_input)) && 
(lower_bound - f(input) > 0)

where

f(input) == (input * pow(10, n_digits_upper_bound - n_digits_input))


 1 is in (  5,   9) -> 1 * pow(10,0) -> same                 -> false
 6 is in (  5,   9)                                          -> true
 1 is in (  5,  11) -> 1 * pow(10,1)  -> 10 is in (5,11)     -> true
 1 is in (  5, 200) -> 1 * pow(10,2)  -> 100 is in (5, 200)  -> true
11 is in (  5,  12)                                          -> true
13 is in (  5,  12) -> 13 * pow(10,0) -> same                -> false 
13 is in (  5,  22)                                          -> true
13 is in (  5, 200)                                          -> true
 2 is in (100, 300) -> 2 * pow(10,2) -> 200 is in (100,300)  -> true
 4 is in (100, 300) -> 4 * pow(10,2)  -> 400 is in (100,300) -> false
13 is in (135, 140) -> 135 - 130                             -> true
14 is in (135, 139) -> 135 - 140                             -> false
share|improve this answer
    
Try 13 in (135, 140). Why does everyone keep suggesting the same broken solution? –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:42
    
(lower_bound - f(input) < 10) && (lower_bound - f(input) > 0) should be (lower_bound - f(input) < pow(10, n_digits_upper_bound - n_digits_input)) && (lower_bound - f(input) > 0) as for 13 in (1350, 1400) –  Eddie Gasparian Oct 1 '12 at 13:29
    
@EddieGasparian Thanks, corrected. –  jrok Oct 1 '12 at 14:53

All the hard cases are situations in which the lower bound has less digits then the upper bound. Just break the range in two (or three). If AB is the union of sets A and B, then x in AB implies x in A or x in B. So:

13 is in (5, 12) => 13 is in (5, 9) OR 13 is in (10, 12)

13 is in (5, 120) => 13 is in (5, 9) OR 13 is in (10, 99) OR 13 is in (100, 120)

Then, truncate to match lengths. I.e.

13 is in (5, 120) => 13 is in (5, 9) OR 13 is in (10, 99) OR 13 is in (100, 120)

After this second rewrite, it becomes a simple numeric check. Note that if you have the range 10,99 appear then you have all possible 2-digit prefixes and don't actually need to check, but that's an optimization. (I'm assuming we ignore prefixes 00-09)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I considered doing that, but it's unnecessarily complicated. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:27

Yes another answer. For input X and bounds MIN and MAX

WHILE (X < MIN)
  IF X is a prefix of MIN
    x = 10*x + next digit of MIN
  ELSE
    x = 10*x
RETURN (x>= MIN && x<=MAX)

This works by "typing" the next lowest digit. So the hard case 13 in (135, 140) adds a 5 to produce 135, not a zero.

share|improve this answer

Whatever the implementation method you chose, you should consider building a lot of unit tests. Because you're asking the question just as you would have written a test for test-driven development (TDD). So I suggest that, while you are waiting for a suitable algorithm to pop out of stack overflow, write your unit tests:

Make your test fail if the examples you give don't yield the results in your examples. Write a couple of other limit test cases just to be sure. Then, if you happen to use a wrong or buggy algorithm, you will know it soon. Once your test passes, you'll know that you've reached your goal.

Plus, it shields you from any regression in the future

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Maybe I'm under-thinking this but assuming that the Min-Max range of integers are all positive (i.e. greater than or equal to zero), this code block should do the trick nicely:

bool CheckRange(int InputValue, int MinValue, int MaxValue)
{
    // Assumes that:
    //    1. InputValue >= MinValue 
    //    2. MinValue >= 0
    //    3. MinValue <= MaxValue 
    //
    if (InputValue < 0)         // The input value is less than zero
        return false;
    //
    if (InputValue > MaxValue)  // The input value is greater than max value
        return false;
    //
    if (InputValue == 0 && InputValue < MinValue)
        return false;       // The input value is zero and less than a non-zero min value
    //
    int WorkValue = InputValue; // Seed a working variable
    //
    while (WorkValue <= MaxValue)
    {
        if (WorkValue >= MinValue && WorkValue <= MaxValue)
            return true; // The input value (or a stem) is within range
        else
            WorkValue *= 10; // Not in range, multiply by 10 to check stem again
    }
    //
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

OK, a bit late to the party, but here goes...

Note that we're talking about user input here, so it's not sufficient to just // TODO: consider overflow. Validating user input is a war, and cutting corners will eventually lead to the detonation of an IED. (Well, ok, maybe not so dramatic, but still...) In fact, only one of the algorithms in ecatmur's useful test harness handles a corner case properly ({23, 2147483644, 2147483646, false}), and the test harness itself goes into an infinite loop if t.max is too big.

The only one which passed was ecatmur_in_range_div, which I think is quite nice. However, it is possible to make it (slightly) faster by adding a few checks:

bool in_range_div(int input, int min, int max)
{
  if (input > max) return false;
  if (input >= min) return true;
  if (max / 10 >= min) return true;

  while (input < min) {
    min /= 10;
    max /= 10;
  }
  return input <= max;
}

How much faster "depends"; it would be particularly useful if min and max were compile-time constants. The first two tests are obvious, I think; the third one can be proven in a variety of ways but the simplest is to just observe the behaviour of ecatmur's loop: when the loop ends, input is >= min but < 10*min, so if 10*min < max, input must be less than max.

Expressing the arithmetic in terms of division rather than multiplication ought to be a habit; I know that most of us grew up with the idea that division is sloooooow and must be avoided. However, division, unlike multiplication, will not overflow. Indeed, whenever you find yourself writing:

if (a * k < b) ...

or

for (..., a < b, a *= k)

or other variations on those themes, you should immediately flag that as integer overflow, and change it to the equivalent division.

Actually, the same goes for addition except in one important (but common) case:

if (a + k < b) ...

or

a += k; if (a < b) ...

are also unsafe unless k is one, and you know that a < b before the addition. That exception lets the normal for loop work without too much thought. But watch out for this, which I used to use as part of an interview question:

// enumerate every kth element of the range [a, b)
assert(a < b);
for (; a < b; a += k) { ... }

Sadly, very few candidates got it.

share|improve this answer

I would now delete this answer, except that it shows a failed approach.

After checking Str(min).StartWith(input), you need to check numerically if any 10^n*Val(input) is within the range, as Ben Voight's current answer says.


Failed attempt

Edited because of Ben Voigt's comment: (I had missed his first point in his current answer: prefix matches to the minimum are OK.)

My solution, based upon @Ben Voigt's insights, is check if Min StartsWith the current input. If not, PadRight the current input with 0 to the length of Max as a string. Then if this modified input is lexically (i.e. treated as strings) between Min and Max it's OK.

Pseudo code:

 Confirm input has only digits, striping leading 0s
    (most easily done by converting it to an integer and back to a string)

 check = Str(min).StartsWith(input)
 If Not check Then
   testInput = input.PadRight(Len(Str(max)), '0')
   check = Str(min) <= testInput && testInput <= Str(max)
 End If
share|improve this answer
    
Try 13 in (135, 140). –  Ben Voigt Oct 2 '12 at 15:46
    
@BenVoigt Thanks for pointing this out. I have adjusted my answer. –  Mark Hurd Oct 3 '12 at 1:05
    
Still not right: try 134 in (135,1400). –  Mark Hurd Oct 3 '12 at 4:41
1  
Right, you need to use numeric comparison and not lexical in the final check. –  Ben Voigt Oct 3 '12 at 4:46
int input = 15;
int lower_bound = 1561;
int upper_bound = 1567;
int ipow = 0;
while (lower_bound > 0) {
    if (lower_bound > input) {
        ++ipow;
        lower_bound = lower_bound / 10;
    } else {
        int i = pow(10, ipow) * input;
        if (i < upper_bound) {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}
return false;
share|improve this answer
    
That's just one testcase. Try 1561. –  MSalters Sep 24 '12 at 14:30
    
returns true, sad that i cant downvote you for downvoting without test –  Denis Ermolin Sep 24 '12 at 14:31
    
I think he means lower_bound = 1561;, other variables remaining the same. –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:36
    
test passes too –  Denis Ermolin Sep 24 '12 at 14:36
    
Anyway, you're returning true any time lower_bound <= input, which clearly is not correct. -1. Try testcase 81 in (700, 799). –  Ben Voigt Sep 24 '12 at 14:37

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