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I want to loop from 1 till 5. That's easy if you use a for loop:

for ($i=1; $i<=5; $i++)
{
 // do something
}

But imagine instead of starting by $i=1 I have a random start number from 1 to 5 and this time its value is 3. So I have to start looping from 3 and the loop sequence should be: 3,4,5,1,2

I already have the radom number, let's say it is 3, then I need 3 4 5 1 2 .. if it was 5, I would be needing 5 1 2 3 4

How can I do this??

Thanks a lot!

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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this :

for ($i = 0, $j = 3; $i < 5; $i++)
{
   echo $j;
   $j %= 5;
   $j++;
}

You need two vars to do what you want. If you set J = 3, it'll do 3 4 5 1 2

have fun.

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it prints 4 5 0 1 2 and if $j= 3, I need it to print 3 4 5 1 2 –  Adts Qdsfsd Sep 24 '12 at 13:56
    
I just updated my answer, this should work now. –  Weacked Sep 24 '12 at 14:14
    
Being $j=3; it prints 3 4 5 6 2 which is great cause it starts by 3 but instead of 1 it shows 6 –  Adts Qdsfsd Sep 24 '12 at 14:16
    
thanks a million, you're amazing! –  Adts Qdsfsd Sep 24 '12 at 14:17
    
You're welcome, don't forget to accept the answers. –  Weacked Sep 24 '12 at 14:18
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You want to start at a certain random point (the offset) and then make a loop of 5:

$offset = rand(1,5);
for ($i=1; $i<=5; $i++)
{
  echo (($i + $offset ) % 5) + 1;
}
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3 is a random number, next load it could be 4 or 2 or 1 or 5 –  Adts Qdsfsd Sep 24 '12 at 13:47
    
Adjusted my answer –  JvdBerg Sep 24 '12 at 13:49
    
your series will produce 3, 4, 0, 1, 2. –  zzzzBov Sep 24 '12 at 13:53
    
I already have the radom number, let's say it is 3, then I need 3 4 5 1 2 .. if it was 5, I would be needing 5 1 2 3 4 –  Adts Qdsfsd Sep 24 '12 at 14:01
    
just replace offset with your random number –  JvdBerg Sep 24 '12 at 14:10
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Well, $i will iterate from 1 to 5 which means you can make another variable $j that is equivalent to $i + 2, but of course it would result in the count of:

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Which is where the modulus operator (%) comes in, the modulus operator gives you the remainder after division by the second number:

3 % 5 //3
7 % 5 //2

If you iterate from 1 to 5 and add 2 (3-7), and take the result mod(5), you'd get:

Equation:

$j = ($i + 2) % 5

3, 4, 0, 1, 2

This is close to what you want, but not quite. So instead of adding 2 initially, add 1 initially, and again after the result of the modulus:

$j = $i;
$j += 1;
$j %= 5;
$j += 1;
//or in one line:
$j = (($i + 1) % 5) + 1;

Which will give you a series of 3, 4, 5, 1, 2.

To use a random offset, just make sure that the initial padding is randomized in a set of 5 consecutive positive integers:

//this could be rand(0, 4) or rand(101, 105)
//it doesn't actually matter which range of 5 integers
//as the modulus operator will bound the results to the range of 0-4
$offset = rand(1, 5);
for ($i = 1; $i <= 5; $i++) {
    $j = (($i + $offset) % 5) + 1;
}
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 $i = array(3,4,5,1,2); //considering you want to follow this order, and not random.
 foreach($i as $v) {
 //do something
 }
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that's hardcoded, I mean 3 is a random number, next load it could be 4 or 2 or 1 or 5 .. –  Adts Qdsfsd Sep 24 '12 at 13:46
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Some (better than my previous) step-by-step example:

First of all you want to have 5 numbers, that is why you do the loop. That could be written as a counter from 0 to 4:

for ($i = 0; $i < 5; $i++) { ...

Then you specify your start value. If you put it into a variable and increase it together with the counter variable, this allows you to count from 1 to 5:

for ($i = 0, $j = 1; $i < 5; $i++, $j++) { ...
             ^^^^^^                ^^^^

Here $i is the counter and $j contains the value you're looking for.

As this example shows, the logic to determine the number of steps to do has been separated from increasing the loop variable.

Now you need to add a check if $j goes higher than 5, and if it does it should be reset to 1. However, a fine way to do that is to use the modulo operator. That means, before increasing $j, it will be set to the remainder of itself divided by 5. That is the modulo operation, % operator in PHP:

for ($i = 0, $j = 3; $i < 5; $i++, $j %= 5, $j++) { ...
                                   ^^^^^^^

And now you've got your for loop that is creating the value.

In this example you can replace the 3 with your random start number. Take care that it is larger than 0 and lower than 6, otherwise at least the first iteration would give you a wrong number.

As you can imagine there are multiple ways how to do that, so this is only one example.

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