Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been reading up on memory management and have come across a situation in a project where the book, nor Google has come up with an exact answer. I already know that delegates are manages objects and events are delegate instances. Having said that, delegate instances will be removed from memory once the application ends.

What I can't figure out is how to ensure that external code has freed up all event references by the time my class is disposed (either explicitly or by the GC). As an example, class A exposes an event and class B consumes it. Class B calls Dispose on class A without freeing up references to the delegates. Of course, we cannot throw an error from the Dispose method itself.

Following is a class with a delegate and another one that consumes it.

public class ClassB
{
    private ClassA A { get; set; }

    public ClassB()
    {
        this.A = new ClassA();
        this.A.OnProcessed += new ClassA.DelegateProcessed(this.ClassA_Processed);
    }

    public void Process()
    {
        this.A.Process();
    }

    public void ClassA_Processed (ClassA sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // Do something.

        // Code written by another developer does not free up events before calling Dispose.

        this.A.Dispose();
        this.A = null;
    }
}

public class ClassA: IDisposable
{
    public delegate void DelegateProcessed (A sender, EventArgs e);
    public event DelegateProcessed OnProcessed = null;

    ~ClassA() { this.Dispose(false); }

    public void Dispose ()
    {
        this.Dispose(true);
        System.GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    private void Dispose (bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.Disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                // Dispose managed resources here.
                // Is it possible / advisable to dispose of delegates / events here?
                // Will this adversely affect the consumer class?
                this.OnProcessed -= new ClassA.DelegateProcessed(this.ClassA_Processed);
            }
        }
        this.Disposed = true;
    }

    public void Process () { this.OnProcessed(this, new EventArgs()); }

    public void ClassA_Processed (ClassA sender, EventArgs e) { }
}

The point is to ensure that ClassA qualifies for garbage collection no matter what the developer does with ClassB. The point is to minimize the amount of time ClassA spends in memory even if the consumer is careless.

UPDATE: It is clear from the answers that the events do not have to be explicitly removed from ClassA. As for the main question, weak references seem to be the way to go as answered below. The objective is to minimize the time ClassA stays in memory. Please let me know in case I have overlooked anythig.

share|improve this question
    
There's something back-to-front about your logic here. It's class A that will hold delegates from class B in the invocation list of OnProcessed , not vice-versa. –  spender Sep 24 '12 at 14:02
    
@spender: I wrote the code in the SO editor so there may be a mistake but I don't follow your point. ClassA is the one with the delegate andf ClassB holds the reference. I am trying to remove the referebnce from within ClassA so that even if ClassB forgets, ClassA can qualify for garbage collection. If you see a mistake, please let me know and I will do the needful. –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 14:04
    
You can safely let instances of class A fall out of scope without anything we've seen in your code holding on to it via delegate instances. However, in your code, if you were to let an instance of B fall out of scope, it would not be collected because there is a delegate pointing to method ClassA_Processed being held in the invocation list of OnProcessed in your instance of class A –  spender Sep 24 '12 at 14:10
    
The client programmer will have the expectation that you'll stop raising events after he disposed your object. Don't disappoint him. –  Hans Passant Sep 24 '12 at 14:12
    
That's for sure @HansPassant. The code snippet is only for illustration. In production, disposed is being tracked, so are delegate instances for thread-safety, etc. –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 14:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of the "classic" Event subscriptions, you should have a look at the Weak Event Patterns.

Event subscriptions may keep objects alive, even if these references are the only references left and the referenced object itself is already gone out of scope. In this case the referenced object will never be collected by the GarbageCollector and stays alive until the end of your application.

This causes serious memory leaks.

If you are using the Weak Events pattern you allow the GabageCollector to better determine if the object is still referenced or if the events are the only references. In this case the objects get collected and your resources get freed.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not know about weak references. It seems slightly more involved than regular references but it is probably the way to go. Thanks. –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 14:11
    
@RaheelKhan: It's not really that much of a difference to implement. But an important one to do, which we discovered the hard way at work, when a lot of our client machines suddenly crashed with inexpected OutOfMemoryExceptions... :-) –  Jens H Sep 24 '12 at 14:25
    
Is that because weak references encourage developers to be lazy? Or did you mean the out-of-memory exceptions were a result of abandoned hard references? –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 14:44
    
@RaheelKhan: This has nothing to do with being lazy. The Weak Events allow the GC to find abandoned references that may be complex to release in code (think about async scenarios with exception handling). In my example above, although trying to clean up properly, we did not yet knew about the impact of the abandoned references at that time. So the OutOfMemoryExceptions were caused by the abondened references that piled up in the thousands. The memory leaks were "simply" fixed by using the Weak Events. –  Jens H Sep 24 '12 at 15:02
    
I misunderstood your point before and see what you mean now. As an example, you could easily run into that sort of scenario with entity objects and PropertyChanged events when dealing with massive rows of data. I see how weak references can overcome that. –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 15:50

IDisposable is used to deterministically release unmanaged resources.

There is no need to remove event handlers. For example, if you look at Windows Forms Form and UserControl classes, or ASP.NET Page and UserControl classes, all of which are IDisposable, you'll see extensive use of events, and no special handling during disposal.

share|improve this answer
    
With reference to WinForms in particular, I have often faced issues where some thread or timer tries to update the UI after the form has been disposed. So I'm not sure how to interpret your post as a solution. –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 14:06
    
@RaheelKhan, you need to design your app to avoid this: in the example you gave, you should check Form.IsDisposed before calling any methods on a form when your code is invoked from another thread. But this doesn't have anything to do with event handlers. –  Joe Sep 24 '12 at 14:21
    
@Joe: Sorry, I disagree. Non-removed event subscription may keep object alive forever and may cause hard-to-find memory leaks. Using the Weak Event Pattern helps against this problem (see my own posted answer). –  Jens H Sep 24 '12 at 14:22
    
@JensH, this is a problem if you have static event handlers, which should be avoided altogether or replaced by a weak event pattern. Or an event handler in an instance that itself is statically referenced, which amounts to the same thing. But in the general case, including the OPs example, it won't be a problem. –  Joe Sep 24 '12 at 14:36
    
@Joe: The problem isn't just with static event handlers, but exists with all event handers whose publisher has a GC lifetime which substantially exceeds the useful lifetime of the subscriber. One of my major major peeves with .net is that it makes event cleanup awkward. There should be no excuse for objects leaving dangling event handlers. They're often harmless, but subtle changes may turn a formerly-harmless dangling event into a killer. Alas, the lack of language support for event clean-up means that ignoring it hoping for the best is often more cost-effective than doing it right. –  supercat Sep 24 '12 at 16:12

This section of the code:

private ClassA A { get; set; }

public ClassB()
{
    this.A = new ClassA();
    this.A.OnProcessed += new ClassA.DelegateProcessed(this.ClassA_Processed);
}

means you have to do nothing.

A B instance owns an A instance and the A has a ref (through the event) to B again.

When a B becomes unreachable then the A will also be collected (GC and circular references).

When the 'A' is Disposed (long) before the B then the 'A' will be collected too (directionality).

The IDispoable interface on A is pointless.


And concerning the implementation:

 // class B
   this.A.OnProcessed += new ClassA.DelegateProcessed(this.ClassA_Processed);

 // in classA
   this.OnProcessed -= new ClassA.DelegateProcessed(this.ClassA_Processed);

This won't work, 2 different this means they are 2 different methods.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that. Having said that, it does not ensure that A will be colleced long before B if the scope of B is application-wide. Am I missing something? –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 14:08
    
Actually the IDisposable on A is for other reasons. But I also wanted to ensure that A's life in memory is minimized. –  Raheel Khan Sep 24 '12 at 14:09
    
OK but then your code does not make the case. Only when A holds (un)managed resources or it occupies a lot of memory will the Dispose() have any effect. In the current code this.A = null; is sufficient. –  Henk Holterman Sep 24 '12 at 14:12

A properly-written class should in its IDisposable.Dispose method unsubscribe from any events to which it has subscribed. If an object whose event was subscribed has a GC lifetime comparable to the useful lifetime of the object which subscribed (which is a very common case), it won't matter whether the subscription is cleaned up or left dangling. Unfortunately, if A is abandoned without unsubscribing itself from B's event, and something keeps a long-lived reference to B (deliberately or not), anything which keeps B alive will also keep alive A and anything to which A holds a direct or indirect reference (including objects which have active event subscriptions from A). It's very easy to end up with large forests of interconnected objects which will usually become eligible for garbage collection, but which will all have to be kept alive as long as any of them is needed.

It's too bad event subscription and unsubscription are so awkward. If there were an object type associated with events, an object which was going to subscribe to various events could use an "event manager" object to manage subscriptions (so one could say something like MyEventManager.Subscribe(SomeObject.SomeEvent, someProc) and then have MyEventManager.Dispose unsubscribe from all the events to which it had established subscriptions. Unfortunately, there's no decent way to have a method accept an event as a parameter, and thus no way to have a general purpose class to manage incoming subscriptions. The best one could do would probably be to have a CleanupManager class which would take a pair of delegates and be invoked something like `MyCleaner.Register(()=>{SomeObject.SomeEvent += someProc;}, ()=>{SomeObject.SomeEvent -= someProc();}) but that seems rather awkward.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.