Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Can iframes be turned on/off on the server-side?

Shouldn't <iframe/> support be client-side? Is it possible that GoDaddy has <iframe/>s disabled by default? Is this even something that can be controlled server-side? This is just a standard Apache httpd server with no bells/whistles (no app servers, proxies, etc.). Is there some kind of server-side JavaScript that GoDaddy could be executing "around" my pages that prevents <iframe/>s from being used? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
Maybe a good response on that email is:'Sure, done!' and then wait for the drama to evolve? Let us know what happens... – rene Sep 24 '12 at 14:27
5  
The X-Frames-Option header can be used to ask a browser to not display a page in a frame. – Rob W Sep 24 '12 at 14:28
1  
Pointy & rene - these are interesting comments, but do not help answer my question. @RobW - can you elaborate? Is this X-Frames-Option sent back in the HttpResponse? If so, is GoDaddy putting a proxy in between the client-side and the pages and preventing them from sending back iframes? If not, can you explain what this header is? Thanks again, and +1! – IAmYourFaja Sep 24 '12 at 14:30
2  
The answer is via Rob W... the web SERVER can request that browsers not allow resources to be in frames. It's a security measure. – mark Sep 24 '12 at 14:37
2  
It's a request from the server to tell the browser not show something in an IFRAME. Each browser can implement what to do with the request. An example might be badsite.html having an IFRAME with bank.html in it, then trying to do bad things with it. The server hosting bank.html can request that bank.html not be allowed in IFRAMES. Good browsers won't allow it. – mark Sep 24 '12 at 14:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A web SERVER can request via a HTTP header in a response that browsers not allow resources to be in frames. It's a security measure.

Browser request to server:

GET /index.html HTTP/1.1
Host: www.bank.com

Server response to browser:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
X-Frame-Options: DENY
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Length: ...

Each browser can implement what to do with that request. An example might be badsite.html having an IFRAME with bank.html in it, then trying to do bad things with it. The server hosting bank.html can request that bank.html not be allowed in a frame (via "DENY"). A "good" browser will recognize the request and not allow bank.html in a frame. If for some reason bank.html should be in a frame, but only in one from THEIR OWN site, they could use the "SAMEORIGIN" option, which would work on their site but not on anyone else's site. Default is to allow frames in general.

share|improve this answer
    
And bickity bam! Answered. Thank you many times over. – IAmYourFaja Sep 24 '12 at 15:02
    
Mark, could you please rephrase your answer so that it contains relevant details/links? Not everyone is going to read the answers at the question (also, paragraphs don't hurt ;)) – Rob W Sep 24 '12 at 15:06
    
yeah my text was kind-of just running along there... trying to help where possible whilst working... i'll do a quick edit – mark Sep 24 '12 at 15:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.