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I have a Directory(Linux/Unix) on a Apache Server with a lot of subdirectory containing lot of files like this:

- Dir  
  - 2010_01/
    - 142_78596_101_322.pdf
    - 12_10.pdf
    - ...
  - 2010_02/   
    - ...

How can i find all files with filesnames looking like: *_*_*_*.pdf ? where * is always a digit!!

I try to solve it like this:

ls -1Rl 2010-01 | grep -i '\(\d)+[_](\d)+[_](\d)+[_](\d)+[.](pdf)$' | wc -l

But the regular expression \(\d)+[_](\d)+[_](\d)+[_](\d)+[.](pdf)$ doesn't work with grep.

Edit 1: Trying ls -l 2010-03 | grep -E '(\d+_){3}\d+\.pdf' | wc -l for example just return null. So it's dont work perfectly

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1  
\d means digit, so your regex is looking for: digits_digits_digits_digits.pdf. What kind of filenames are there that you don't want to match? –  ers81239 Sep 24 '12 at 14:27
    
oh sorry... i edited my post –  trouble Sep 24 '12 at 14:29
    
Are you trying to match 12_10.pdf or only 142_78596_101_322.pdf in the example? –  the wolf Sep 24 '12 at 15:27
    
i'm trying to match the second one!! –  trouble Sep 24 '12 at 16:14

3 Answers 3

Try using find.

The command that satisfies your specification __*_*.pdf where * is always a digit:

find 2010_10/ -regex '__\d+_\d+\.pdf'

You seem to be wanting a sequence of 4 numbers separated by underscores, however, based on the regex that you tried.

(\d+_){3}\d+\.pdf

Or do you want to match all names containing solely numbers/underscores?

[\d_]+\.pdf
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The stackoverflow formatted deleted some characters! files have the format *_*_*_*.pdf I will try the regex you posted!! –  trouble Sep 24 '12 at 14:49
    
i try (\d+_){3}\d+\.pdf with find and grep without success!! –  trouble Sep 24 '12 at 15:12
1  
I'm not in an environment where I am able to test this, but you may need to add the -regextype posix-extended flag to the find command. –  vinnydiehl Sep 24 '12 at 18:37

First, you should be using egrep vs grep or call grep with -E for extended patterns.

So this works for me:

$ cat test2.txt
- Dir  
  - 2010_01/
    - 142_78596_101_322.pdf
    - 12_10.pdf
    - ...
  - 2010_02/   
    - ...

Now egrep that file:

cat test2.txt | egrep '((?:\d+_){3}(?:\d+)\.pdf$)'
- 142_78596_101_322.pdf

Since there are parenthesis around the whole pattern, the entire file name will be captured.

Note that the pattern does NOT work with grep in traditional mode:

$ cat test2.txt | grep '((?:\d+_){3}(?:\d+)\.pdf$)'
... no return

But DOES work if you use the extend pattern switch (the same as calling egrep):

$ cat test2.txt | grep -E '((?:\d+_){3}(?:\d+)\.pdf$)'
- 142_78596_101_322.pdf 
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to gbchaosmaster and the wolf I find a way which work for me:

Into a Directory:

find . | grep -P "(\d+_){3}\d+\.pdf" | wc -l

At the Root Directory:

find 20*/ | grep -P "(\d+_){3}\d+\.pdf" | wc -l
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