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I have the following code:

// 1.
        public void RunSQL(QuerySetup querySetup)
        {
            //querySetup.Users is 10
            for (int i = 1; i <= querySetup.Users; i++)
            {
                querySetup.CurrentUser = i;
                var worker = new BackgroundWorker {WorkerReportsProgress = true};
                worker.DoWork += worker_DoWork;
                worker.RunWorkerCompleted += worker_RunWorkerCompleted;
                worker.RunWorkerAsync(querySetup);
            }
        }


    // 2.
    void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        var querySetup = e.Argument as QuerySetup;
        // Doing stuff...
        e.Result = querySetup.CurrentUser;
    }

    // 3.
    void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("User " + e.Result.ToString() + " is done.");
    }

My goal is, that at the end I get:

User 1 is done

User 2 is done

...

User 10 is done

(not in that particular order)

But I only get 10x "User 10 is done".

But why? I need to somehow mark my worker process, so that I can identify it later.

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1  
You're passing the same querySetup object to all workers. –  João Angelo Sep 24 '12 at 14:43
    
Yep, what @JoãoAngelo said. –  Grant H. Sep 24 '12 at 14:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, there is only 1 querySetup object here and the main loop will continuously change currentUser.
All threads will share that single object.

 for (int i = 1; i <= querySetup.Users; i++)
 {
     querySetup.CurrentUser = i;
     ... 
     worker.RunWorkerAsync(querySetup);
 }

The basic solution (if you don't need other querySetup members)

 for (int i = 1; i <= querySetup.Users; i++)
 {
     //querySetup.CurrentUser = i;
     ... 
     worker.RunWorkerAsync(i);
 }
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Oh well... of course. I need the other members, but now I get the point. Thanks. –  Feroc Sep 24 '12 at 14:48

There is only one instance of QuerySetup.

You are storing the current user on this one instance. So the current user will always be the last one in your loop.

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If all your workers finish after the loop is finished, then they will all see the same global state of querySetup.CurrentUser, which is 10 at that moment.

The best approach with multithreading is not to share the state between threads (because that forces you to synchronize access to that state), but instead providing each thread function with its own copy of data. In this case, it would mean that instead of providing querySetup as data for thread function, you provide querySetup.CurrentUser

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