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my case is: loop and thread are working parallel.. i want to stop the execution of loop untill thread is done with its functionality, when the thread state is stopped, at that time i want to execute the loop further..

            for (int pp = 0; pp < LstIop.Count; pp++)
            {
                oCntrlImageDisplay = new CntrlImageDisplay();
                oCntrlImageEdit = new CntrlImageEdit();
                axAcroPDF1 = new AxAcroPDFLib.AxAcroPDF();
                int pages = ConvertFileIntoBinary(LstIop[pp].Input, oCntrlImageEdit);
                oCntrlImageDisplay.ImgDisplay.Image = LstIop[pp].Output;
                oCntrlImageDisplay.ImgEditor.Image = oCntrlImageDisplay.ImgDisplay.Image;


                if (t1 == null || t1.ThreadState.ToString() == "Stopped")
                {
                    t1 = new Thread(() => convert(pages, LstIop[pp].Input, LstIop[pp].Output, stIop[pp].Temp));
                    t1.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
                    t1.IsBackground = true;
                    CheckForIllegalCrossThreadCalls = false;
                    t1.Start();

                }
            }
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1  
If loop is supposed to wait for thread to finish how is that different from just doing the job in the loop? –  Dialecticus Sep 24 '12 at 15:45
    
Then why call the code in a separate thread? Why not just call the convert method directly in the loop? –  mbeckish Sep 24 '12 at 15:47
    
If the next thread cannot be started until the current one is done, then your threads are not working in parallel, you might just as well don't bother throwing in threads at all. A better solution would be to make a loop which starts threads for all images and then wait until they're all done before continuing. –  Mattias Buelens Sep 24 '12 at 15:47
    
CheckForIllegalCrossThreadCalls should basically never be false. If you need to modify UI elements either don't put that task in another thread or marshal the code back to the UI thread when accessing those items. As it is your code will just be full of hard to debug race conditions. –  Servy Sep 24 '12 at 15:48
    
I'm guessing you don't simply want to do t1.Join() after t1.Start, which would make having converty in a separate thread to the loop, near pointless. –  Tony Hopkinson Sep 24 '12 at 15:50

2 Answers 2

up vote -1 down vote accepted

as the others have said, there is no point in threading here, but if your hell bent on it, do Async. just use .Invoke or, .begininvoke followed by a .endInvoke

EX:

    delegate void T2();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        T2 Thread = new T2(Work);

        while (true)
        {
            IAsyncResult result = Thread.BeginInvoke(null, null);

            //OTHER WORK TO DO

            Thread.EndInvoke(result);
        }
    }

    static void Work()
    {
       //WORK TO DO
    }

using delegates is nice because you can specify return data, and send parameters

    delegate double T2(byte[] array,string text, int num);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        T2 Thread = new T2(Work);

        while (true)
        {
            IAsyncResult result = Thread.BeginInvoke(null, null);

            //OTHER WORK TO DO

            double Returned = Thread.EndInvoke(result);
        }
    }

    static double Work(byte[] array, string text, int num)
    {
        // WORK TO DO
        return(3.4);
    }
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This is rather outdated. It's not only unlikely that the OP wants to do this, but if someone did want to do this using Tasks would be easier and more powerful. –  Servy Sep 24 '12 at 16:11
    
As I said, it's unlikely that this will be the approach he needs to take, and it's not done very well even if it is. Oh, and you should almost never be defining your own delegates these days, you can just use Func and/or Action to cover 99% of your use cases. –  Servy Sep 24 '12 at 16:16

To wait for the thread to finish executing, call:

t1.join();
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You'd end up writing t1.Start(); t1.Join();, which simply makes the whole thing sequential. There's nothing running in parallel. –  Mattias Buelens Sep 24 '12 at 15:49

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