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I have a windows service which receives messages via RabbitMQ, this triggers an event handler which does some work and then attempts to persist the result to the database. It's threaded using:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(ProcessMessageOnThread, messageReceived);

where ProcessMessageOnThread is a method which does the work on the messageReceived which is a representation of the message dequeued from RabbitMQ.

Under normal circumstances the windows service operated as expected, that is dequeue, process and persist.

I want to ensure that all of my messages are processed and given a fair change to be processed so if I can't open a connection to SQL Server I simply requeue the message for it to be processed again (hopefully that time the SQL Server will be back, otherwise this continues - and I'm fine with that).

Now the problem comes when the process has been running as expected for a period of time, the SQL Server connection pool has filled up and then SQL Server is disconnected, now this is when things get a bit unstable.

One of two things can happen:

  • An exception is thrown on connection.Open() - however I'm catching this and so not worried about it

  • An exception is thrown on cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() - which is where I'm executing a stored procedure

It is the second option that I need to figure out how to handle. Previously I assumed that any exception here meant that there was a problem with the data I was passing into the stored procedure and therefore should just move it out of the queue and have something else analyse it.

However, now I think I need a new approach to handle the cases where the exception is to do with the connection not actually being established.

I've had a look at the SqlException class and noticed a property called Class which has this description Gets the severity level of the error returned from SQL Server, now the info on this says:

Messages with a severity level of 10 or less are informational and indicate problems caused by mistakes in information that a user has entered. Severity levels from 11 through 16 are generated by the user, and can be corrected by the user. Severity levels from 17 through 25 indicate software or hardware errors. When a level 17, 18, or 19 error occurs, you can continue working, although you might not be able to execute a particular statement.

Does this mean to fix my exception handling I can just check if (ex.Class > 16) then requeue message because the problem is with the connection else throw it away as it is most likely to do with malformed data being send to the stored procedure?

So the question is, how should I do exception handling and how can I detect when calling cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() if the exception thrown is because of a disconnected connection.


Update:

I've experienced problems previously with connections not being returned to the pool (this was due to threading issues) and have fixed those problems, so I'm confident the issue isn't to do with connections not going back into the pool. Also, the logic around what the connections are being used for is so simple also I'm ensuring they are closed consistently...so I'm more interested in answers to do with the disconnection of the Sql Server and then the capturing the behaviour of cmd.ExecuteNonQuery()

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1 Answer 1

Connections in the connection pool can get into a weird state for various reasons, all of which have to do with poor application design:

  • Closing the connection before its associated data reader
  • Change a setting (like transaction isolation level) that the pool does not reset
  • Starting an asynchronous query (BeginOpenReader) and then returning the connection to the pool before the asynchronous handler fires

You should investigate your application and make sure connections are properly returned to the pool. One thing that can help debugging is reducing the size of the application pool in a development setting. You change the size of the pool in the connection string:

...;Integrated Security=SSPI;Max Pool Size=2;Pooling=True;

This makes pooling issues much easy to reproduce.

If you can't find the cause, but still need to deploy a fix, you could use one of ClearPool or ClearAllPools. A good place to do that is when you detect one of the suspicious exceptions after Open() or ExecuteNonQuery(). Both are static methods on the SqlConnection class:

SqlConnection.ClearPool(yourConnection);

Or for an even rougher approach:

SqlConnection.ClearAllPools()

Note that this is basically Pokémon Exception Handling. If it works, you'll have no idea why. :)

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I've experienced problems previously with connections not being returned to the pool (this was due to threading issues) and have fixed those problems, so I'm confident the issue isn't to do with connections not going back into the pool. Also, the logic around what the connections are being used for is so simple also I'm ensuring they are closed consistently...so I'm more interested in answers to do with the disconnection of the Sql Server and then the capturing the behaviour of cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() –  kzhen Sep 24 '12 at 16:40

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