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Let's say I have three classes A, B and C as below, A and B have property Pro1 and Pro2 with Type C:

class A
{
    public C Pro1 {get; set; }
}

class B
{
    public C Pro2 { get; set; }
}

public class C
{
    public void Do()
    {
        //How to get Type of object to reference to current object C
        //Example: Either type A or B
    }
}

In the method Do of class C I want to get which current parent object to reference to current object C (via Pro1 and Pro2). In this sample either A or B, but in general, it could be very dynamic:

var a = new A() { Pro1 = new C() };
a.Pro1.Do(); //will get Type A in Do

var b = new B() { Pro2 = new C() };
b.Pro2.Do(); //with get Type B in Do

Which approach I can achieve this?

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1  
What are you doing in Do? There are cleaner ways of implementing this behavior (A & B implementing a common interface and passing them through, for example) than reacting on types, which gets ugly quickly. –  Austin Salonen Sep 24 '12 at 16:44
    
@AustinSalonen: I tried to figure out from this question and lead me to this point: stackoverflow.com/questions/12552646/… –  Cuong Le Sep 24 '12 at 16:53
1  
As in the original question that led to this one, there is no direct way to do what's asked without some redefinition of the classes. Maybe add generic type parameters, maybe add some sort of interface, something. If you keep the classes as written in the question, there is just no way for an instance of C to know if it was obtained from A.Pro1 or B.Pro2. For instance, the object returned by those two properties might even be the exact same object! –  João Mendes Sep 24 '12 at 22:35
    
I've added a new suggestion to Mattias's question you linked. Hopefully, that'll get him on the right track. –  João Mendes Sep 24 '12 at 23:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could pass the "parent" object as a parameter to the C constructor:

public class C
{
    private readonly object _parent;
    public C(object parent)
    {
        _parent;
    }

    public void Do()
    {
        Type type = _parent != null ? _parent.GetType() : null;
        // Do something with type...
    }
}
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var a = new A() { Pro1 = new C() };
a.Pro1.Do(); //will get Type A in Do

var b = new B() { Pro2 = new C() };
b.Pro2.Do(); //with get Type B in Do

By this, you already know which object is making the call (a or b); what you are doing may not make sense then. If so, you can always resolve this with simple inheritance

C a=new A();
C b=new B();

and the ctors A or B can be inserted an identity of the caller.

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Thomas Levesque has given one way of adding more info to C to achive this. If it is the type rather than the particular instance you want to store in C, you could make C generic, as in:

class A
{
  public C<A> Pro1 { get; set; }
}

class B
{
  public C<B> Pro2 { get; set; }
}

public class C<T> where T : class   // maybe you want to add other "where" constraints on T
{
  public void Do()
  {
    // you can use T in here
  }
}
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