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Why does this code throw an error?

// global non-strict code
(function eval () { 'use strict'; });

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/SE3eX/1/

So, what we have here is a named function expression. I'd like to explicitly point out that this function expression appears in non-strict code. As you can see, its function body is strict code.

The strict mode rules are here: http://ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-C

The relevant bullet is this one (it's the last one on the list):

It is a SyntaxError to use within strict mode code the identifiers eval or arguments as the Identifier of a FunctionDeclaration or FunctionExpression or as a formal parameter name (13.1). Attempting to dynamically define such a strict mode function using the Function constructor (15.3.2) will throw a SyntaxError exception.

Notice how this rule only applies if the function declaration/expression itself appears in strict code, which it does not in my example above.

But it still throws an error? Why?

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3  
Just totally guessing here, but maybe it has something to do with the fact that in an expression, a function instantiation expression with a name binds that name only within the function; in other words, it's internally as if there were some magic way for a var declaration to create a local variable initialized with a reference to the function. Thus, it's as if you were attempting to bind the global symbol "eval" locally. –  Pointy Sep 24 '12 at 16:36
    
@Pointy Good hint. I'll have to check the standard to establish what exactly is going on in that scenario... –  Šime Vidas Sep 24 '12 at 16:42
1  
You get the same error message (SyntaxError: Function name may not be eval or arguments in strict mode) with only function eval () { 'use strict'; }; –  some Sep 24 '12 at 16:55
1  
And this works without syntax error: window.eval = function () { 'use strict'; }; –  some Sep 24 '12 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

§13.1 outlines what ought to happen in cases such as yours:

  • It is a SyntaxError if any Identifier value occurs more than once within a FormalParameterList of a strict mode FunctionDeclaration or FunctionExpression.
  • It is a SyntaxError if the Identifier "eval" or the Identifier "arguments" occurs within a - FormalParameterList of a strict mode FunctionDeclaration or FunctionExpression.
  • It is a SyntaxError if the Identifier "eval" or the Identifier "arguments" occurs as the Identifier of a strict mode FunctionDeclaration or FunctionExpression.

Emphasis mine. Your strict-mode function's identifier is eval, thus, it's a SyntaxError. Game over.


To see why the above is a "strict mode function expression," look at the semantic definitions in §13 (Function Definition):

The production
FunctionExpression : function Identifieropt ( FormalParameterListopt ) { FunctionBody } is evaluated as follows:

  1. Return the result of creating a new Function object as specified in 13.2 with parameters specified by FormalParameterListopt and body specified by FunctionBody. Pass in the LexicalEnvironment of the running execution context as the Scope. Pass in true as the Strict flag if the FunctionExpression is contained in strict code or if its FunctionBody is strict code.

Emphasis mine. The above shows how a function expression (or declaration) becomes strict. What it says (in plain English) is that a FunctionExpression is strict in two scenarios:

  1. It's called from a use strict context.
  2. Its function body begins with use strict.

Your confusion arises from thinking that only the function body is strict, when in fact, the entire function expression is strict. Your logic, while intuitive, is not how JS works.


If you're wondering why ECMAscript works this way, it's pretty simple. Suppose we have this:

// look ma, I'm not strict
(function eval() {
     "use strict";
     // evil stuff
     eval(); // this is a perfectly legal recursive call, and oh look...
             // ... I implicitly redefined eval() in a strict block
     // evil stuff
})();

Thankfully, the above code will throw because the entire function expression is flagged as strict.

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1  
nailed it. that's exactly what's happening here –  Claudiu Sep 24 '12 at 17:00
    
So a function expression that occurs in non-strict code, but whose function body is strict code, is a "strict mode function expression"? Could you find this definition in the standard, please? –  Šime Vidas Sep 24 '12 at 17:03
1  
@ŠimeVidas ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-10.1.1 - "Function code that is part of a FunctionDeclaration, FunctionExpression, or accessor PropertyAssignment is strict function code if its FunctionDeclaration, FunctionExpression, or PropertyAssignment is contained in strict mode code or if the function code begins with a Directive Prologue that contains a Use Strict Directive." –  Pete Sep 24 '12 at 17:07
    
@ŠimeVidas - amended my answer. –  David Titarenco Sep 24 '12 at 17:09
    
@Pete Hm, that definition defines the term "strict function code", which is not the same as a "strict mode function". The former refers to code within a function, while the latter refers to the function itself. –  Šime Vidas Sep 24 '12 at 17:12

Great question!

So to find the answer to your problem you actually need to look at the process for declaring a function (specifically, steps 3-5 -- emphasis added):

  1. ...
  2. ...
  3. Call the CreateImmutableBinding concrete method of envRec passing the String value of Identifier as the argument.
  4. Let closure be the result of creating a new Function object as specified in 13.2 with parameters specified by FormalParameterListopt and body specified by FunctionBody. Pass in funcEnv as the Scope. Pass in true as the Strict flag if the FunctionExpression is contained in strict code or if its FunctionBody is strict code.
  5. Call the InitializeImmutableBinding concrete method of envRec passing the String value of Identifier and closure as the arguments.

So, what happens is that your use of eval isn't a problem when the binding gets created in step 3, but once it hits step 5, it's attempting to initialize the binding of eval within a strict lexical environment (i.e. assigning something to eval), which is not allowed because we're in a strict context following step 4.

Remember that the restriction is not on initializing a new eval variable. It's on using it as the LeftHandSideExpression of an Assignment operator, which is what happens in step 5 of the function declaration process.

UPDATE:

As @DavidTitarenco pointed out, this is explicitly covered in section 13.1 (in addition to the implicit restriction in section 13).

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Hm, I don't think that InitializeImmutableBinding utilizes the assignment operator. The assignment operator "exists" in the source code, whereas InitializeImmutableBinding is an internal method. I doubt that it's defined in JavaScript. –  Šime Vidas Sep 24 '12 at 17:34
    
@ŠimeVidas you're right. It doesn't appear to violate the letter of the spec, but it does seem to violate the spirit of the spec. Which is something you have to take into account on an all-too-regular basis with ECMAScript. :-/ (that's code for, "your guess is as good as mine" -- I wish I could upvote this question twice). –  Pete Sep 24 '12 at 17:42

I'm guessing that it throws an error because inside the function eval would point to the function itself which now is in violation of the strict mode.

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