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So, I've been trying to figure out how custom iterators work, and after investing so many hours and still coming up short, I've decided to ask the community at large: What am I doing wrong? Please help, explanations would be nice, but not necessary if it is "minor".

As a side question, does anyone know what the requirements are to get "show as Collection Association" to work in the class diagram thing in MSVS? does it just not work with c++? Even my bar2 is not a collection of ints as far as it is concerned.

Here is my code, it should compile, but obviously my iterator is broken...

EDIT: Since people are asking, the problem is that the iterator I implemented does not iterate over Bar

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<class T> 
class Foo
{
public:
    template<class T>

    class FooIterator : std::iterator<std::forward_iterator_tag, T, ptrdiff_t, T*, T&>
    {
    public:
        Foo<T>* arrayPtr;
        int index, size;
        FooIterator(Foo<T>* arrayPtr, int size, int index) : arrayPtr(arrayPtr), size(size), index(index) {}

        T& operator*() {return *(arrayPtr->operator[](index));}
        T* operator->() {return &(operator*());}

        FooIterator &operator++(){++index; return *this;}
        FooIterator operator++(int){FooIterator tmp(*this); ++(*this); return tmp;}
        bool operator!=(const FooIterator &other) const {return other.index == index;}
    };

    T** ts;
    int size;
    int index;

    typedef FooIterator<T> fooiterator;
    fooiterator begin(){return fooiterator(this, size, 0);}
    fooiterator end(){return fooiterator(this, size, size);}

    ~Foo();

    void init(int size);
    void insert(T* item);
    T* operator[](int index);

    typedef T          value_type;
    typedef T*         pointer;
    typedef const T*   const_pointer;
    typedef T&         reference;
    typedef const T&   const_reference;
    typedef int        size_type;
    typedef ptrdiff_t  difference_type;
};

template<class T>
void Foo<T>::init(int size)
{
    ts = new T*[size];
    index = 0;
}

template<class T>
Foo<T>::~Foo()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < index; i++)
        delete ts[i];
    delete ts;
}

template<class T>
void Foo<T>::insert(T* item)
{
    ts[index++] = item;
}

template<class T>
T* Foo<T>::operator[](int index)
{
    return ts[index];
}

struct Bar
{
public:
    Foo<int> nums;
    Bar()
    {
        nums.init(3);
        int val = 1;
        nums.insert(new int(1));
        nums.insert(new int(2));
        nums.insert(new int(3));

        for each (int var in nums)
        {
            cout << var << endl;
        }
    }
};

struct Bar2
{
    vector<int> nums;
    Bar2()
    {

        nums.push_back(4);
        nums.push_back(5);
        nums.push_back(6);
        for each (int var in nums)
        {
            cout << var << endl;
        }
    }
};

int main ()
{
    Bar bar;
    /*for (int i = 0; i < bar.nums.index; i++)
    {
        cout << *bar.nums[i] << endl;
    }*/
    Bar2 bar2;
    cin.get();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Rob Kennedy, ecatmur, pmr, Kerrek SB, Jason Sturges Sep 24 '12 at 17:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
What is the issue? –  devshorts Sep 24 '12 at 16:39
    
I will ask the same question... could you tell us what's wrong with it? post compile eroor / problem description –  Karoly Horvath Sep 24 '12 at 16:40
    
T** ouch. That hurts. –  Bartek Banachewicz Sep 24 '12 at 16:41
    
No, it does not compile. There is an (unnecessarily shadowed template parameter) and for each is not C++. –  pmr Sep 24 '12 at 16:43
    
@pmr, for each is visual c++ feature –  Lol4t0 Sep 24 '12 at 16:44

1 Answer 1

One obvious problem is that operator!= actually tests for equality.

share|improve this answer
    
what should it do? I was pretty much trying to follow examples I've seen...oh nvm lol –  paycheck87 Sep 24 '12 at 16:57

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