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Suppose the following template method implementation:

public abstract class Abs
  {
    void DoYourThing()
    {
      log.Info("Starting");
      try
      {
        DoYourThingInternal();
        log.Info("All done");
      }
      catch (MyException ex)
      {
        log.Error("Something went wrong here!");
        throw;
      }
    }

    protected abstract void DoYourThingInternal();

  }

Now, there are plenty of info around on how to test the Abs class, and make sure that DoYourThingInternal is called.
However, suppose I want to test my Conc class:

 public class Conc : Abs
  {
    protected override void DoYourThingInternal()
    {
      // Lots of awesome stuff here!
    }
  }

I wouldn't want to do conc.DoYourThing(), since this will invoke the parent method, which was already tested separately.

I would like to test only the overriding method.

Any ideas?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I wouldn't consider DoYourThingInternal() to be separate from DoYourThing() (as in, two separate modules of code that can be tested in isolation) since you won't be able to instantiate your abstract class alone anyways and the 2 methods will always be run together. Besides, DoYourThingInternal() has access to all protected members of your class and could modify them, with potential side effects on DoYourThing(). So I think it would be dangerous to test DoYourThing() in complete isolation from a concrete implementation of DoYourThingInternal().

However, that doesn't mean you can't have separate tests for DoYourThing()'s expected behavior, which has to remain the same across all implementations of Abs, and DoYourThingInternal()'s expected behavior.

You could use an (abstract) base test class where you define a test for the general behavior expected from DoYourThing(). Then create as many test subclasses as there are implementations of Abs, with unit tests for the specifics of each implementation.

The test from the base test class will be inherited, and when you run any subclass's tests, the inherited test for DoYourThing() will also run :

public abstract class AbsBaseTest
{
  public abstract Abs GetAbs();

  [Test]
  public void TestSharedBehavior() 
  {
    getAbs().DoYourThing();

    // Test shared behavior here...
  }
}

[TestFixture]
public class AbsImplTest : AbsBaseTest
{
  public override Abs GetAbs()
  {
    return new AbsImpl();
  }

  [Test]
  public void TestParticularBehavior()
  {
    getAbs().DoYourThing();

    // Test specific behavior here
  }
}

See http://hotgazpacho.org/2010/09/testing-pattern-factory-method-on-base-test-class/

Don't know if abstract test class inheritance is supported by all unit test frameworks though (I think NUnit does).

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I assume part of the 'problem' is that there is no way to call a protected method from outside the class. How about a mock class which derives from Conc and provides a new public method:

public class MockConc: Conc
  {
    void MockYourThingInternal()
    {
      DoYourThingInternal()
    }
  }
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You have labeled the question "tdd" but I doubt you've followed that principle when you encountered this "problem".

If you truly followed tdd your work flow would have been something like

  1. Write a test for some logic not yet implemented
  2. Impl the easiest possible impl for this test to make it green (logic on Conc1 for example)
  3. Refactor
  4. Write a test for some other logic not yet implemented
  5. Impl the easiest possible impl for this test to make it green (logic on Conc2 for example)
  6. Refactor

In "6" you might think that it would be a great idea to implement a template method because Conc1 and Conc2 share some logic. Just do it, and run your tests to see that the logic still works.

Write tests to verify the logic, don't base them how the implementation look like (=start with the tests). In this case, start writing tests verifying that the logic works (the logic later placed in your concrete types). Yes, that means that some code lines (the one in your abstract class) are tested multiple times. But so what? One of the point of writing tests is that you should be able to refactor your code but still be able to verify that it works by running your tests. If you later don't want to use template method pattern, in a ideal world your shouldn't need to change any tests, but just change the implementation.

If you start to think which code lines you test, IMO you loose much of the benefits of writing tests at all. You want to ensure that your logic works - write tests for this instead.

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I see what you mean. And it does make sense. However, if I do, as you suggested, test some code lines multiple times, that means that if I change those code lines, I need to change multiple tests. And that might be a high price to pay... –  sJhonny Sep 26 '12 at 8:48
1  
(assuming we're talking TDD now...) You don't just change code lines. You add new functionality which means adding one or many new tests. To make these pass you change implemented code. If that means this breaks old tests, it means some old specifications/tests no longer are valid. And that's the good thing having tests in the first place -> you now have a chance knowing that your new code changed old behavior. Was the new code breaking old code? Is the old tests/specifications no longer valid? Do you need to ask your customer/product manager "what about the old spec? No longer valid?" –  Roger Sep 26 '12 at 13:20
    
Very good point. admittedly, I find it hard to think with a 'TDD' mindset... –  sJhonny Sep 26 '12 at 22:16

What about sticking an interface on Abs and mocking it? Ignoring the calls, or set expectations on them?

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not sure I understand; could you elaborate? –  sJhonny Sep 24 '12 at 17:53

You could do it several ways, many of which are documented here already. Here is the approach I typically take: Have the test case inherit from the concrete class.

public ConcTest : Conc
{
    [Test]
    public void DoesItsThingRight()
    {
         var Result = DoItsThingInternal();
         // Assert the response
    }
}

Hope that helps!

Brandon

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