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I am having trouble understanding this issue - I have a sharded cluster in which one of the shards (Shard 2) seems to use the wrong index. Im querying by the shard key, which is site id and first request time { site.id: 1, frt: 1 }. I also have an index on site id and last request time.

In this query, I am also trying to limit returned documents by a couple booleans I have set in the document.

Reading the docs on how Mongo's Query Optimizer works, this seems especially weird to me looking at the returned Explains. Docs here: Query Optimizer

I also included an explain from Shard 1 where the query returns as expected. Lastly, if I use a site id which does not have chunks stored on Shard 2, it uses the correct index, though it has nothing to scan nor return. Added explain for this to the end for completeness.

Any ideas why this would happen and/or if this is a bug?

Basic query (bad index):

shard2:PRIMARY> db.visit.find({ "site.id": 128, "frt": { $gte: new Date(2012, 8, 24 ) }, "ue": false, "bot": false }).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor site.id_1_lrt_-1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 198,
    "nscannedObjects" : 61204,
    "nscanned" : 61204,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 61537,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 61537,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 122,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 727,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "site.id" : [
            [
                128,
                128
            ]
        ],
        "lrt" : [
            [
                {
                    "$maxElement" : 1
                },
                {
                    "$minElement" : 1
                }
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "ip-10-4-211-107:2200"
}

Supplying a Hint:

shard2:PRIMARY> db.visit.find({ "site.id": 128, "frt": { $gte: new Date(2012, 8, 24 ) }, "ue": false, "bot": false }).hint("site.id_1_frt_1").explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor site.id_1_frt_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 198,
    "nscannedObjects" : 486,
    "nscanned" : 486,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 486,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 486,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 5,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "site.id" : [
            [
                128,
                128
            ]
        ],
        "frt" : [
            [
                ISODate("2012-09-24T07:00:00Z"),
                ISODate("292278995-01--2147483647T07:12:56.808Z")
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "ip-10-4-211-107:2200"
}

Same query WITHOUT additional boolean constraints (uses correct Index):

shard2:PRIMARY> db.visit.find({ "site.id": 128, "frt": { $gte: new Date(2012, 8, 24 ) } }).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor site.id_1_frt_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 486,
    "nscannedObjects" : 486,
    "nscanned" : 486,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 486,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 486,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 1,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "site.id" : [
            [
                128,
                128
            ]
        ],
        "frt" : [
            [
                ISODate("2012-09-24T07:00:00Z"),
                ISODate("292278995-01--2147483647T07:12:56.808Z")
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "ip-10-4-211-107:2200"
}

On Shard 1, Original Query uses expected index:

shard1:PRIMARY> db.visit.find({ "site.id": 253, "frt": { $gte: new Date(2012, 8, 24 ) }, "ue": false, "bot": false }).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor site.id_1_frt_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 15615,
    "nscannedObjects" : 15950,
    "nscanned" : 15950,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 16152,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 16152,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 125,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 237,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "site.id" : [
            [
                253,
                253
            ]
        ],
        "frt" : [
            [
                ISODate("2012-09-24T07:00:00Z"),
                ISODate("292278995-01--2147483647T07:12:56.808Z")
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "ip-10-6-50-253:2100"
}

Query on Shard 2 for Site with no chunks here ( Uses correct index ):

shard2:PRIMARY> db.visit.find({ "site.id": 253, "frt": { $gte: new Date(2012, 8, 24 ), "ue": false, "bot": false } }).explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor site.id_1_frt_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 0,
    "nscannedObjects" : 0,
    "nscanned" : 0,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 0,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 0,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 0,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "site.id" : [
            [
                253,
                253
            ]
        ],
        "frt" : [
            [
                ISODate("2012-09-24T07:00:00Z"),
                ISODate("292278995-01--2147483647T07:12:56.808Z")
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "ip-10-4-211-107:2200"
}
share|improve this question
    
tldr? indexes are getting lost when adding to the query? –  Ascherer Sep 24 '12 at 16:56
    
What's your shard key? Your mentioned that your query db.visit.find({ "site.id": 128, "frt": { $gte: new Date(2012, 8, 24 ) }, "ue": false, "bot": false }).explain() is hitting the wrong index on "Shard2" but you didn't include output of running this query on "Shard1". All queries against "Shard1" are for "site.id" 128. Can you run the query against "Shard1" for "128". –  Mark Hillick Sep 24 '12 at 20:52
    
Mentioned it above, shard key is { site.id: 1, frt: 1 }, sharded on the same index I am attempting to use. Running that query for "site.id" 128 on Shard 1 does still use the correct index, but because of how the chunks are split, there is no data for that site. I chose "site.id": 253 for the example on Shard 1 above because I knew there was data there. –  kmfk Sep 24 '12 at 22:53
    
Think you might have confused the examples above, "All queries against "Shard1" are for "site.id" 128." - actually, none of the queries above are querying for site 128 on Shard 1... –  kmfk Sep 24 '12 at 22:57
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A couple of things from the docs you link that might explain this behavior, first:

Testing of queries repeats after 1,000 operations and also after certain manipulations of a collection occur (such as adding an index).

So, if you don't have enough volume of queries for it to be evaluated, it will stick with its first choice.

Second:

To solve this, when testing new plans, MongoDB executes multiple query plans in parallel. As soon as one finishes, it terminates the other executions, and the system has learned which plan is good.

If the other index is already in memory, say because it is being used by another query, or something else is going on that slows down the query execution on the preferred index (or it is very close and occasionally they swap in terms of speed), then you will get the "bad" index being returned again.

The optimizer has been tweaked and improved in 2.2, so that may be worth a look if you continue to have problems (and are on 2.0 or below). Or, as you have already done in your testing, if you know the best index to use, just remove all doubt and use hint to specify it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the post. I should have included in my post, this is on 2.2. The second quoted paragraph is what I found odd, if is does indeed run the query plans in parallel to determine the 'best', its seems odd, given the very large time difference between the two query plans. I also tried setting up a loop and running this query 1000+ times to see if I could trick the optimizer into re-evaluating the query plans. No dice. I first noticed performance issues while using an aggregate query, in which there is no option to use hint on a $match operator. –  kmfk Sep 25 '12 at 0:07
    
sounds like this might be a bug - have you tried (temporarily) dropping the bad index, running the query, then re-adding it as a potential workaround (albeit a bad one) –  Adam C Sep 25 '12 at 22:48
    
Yeah - gonna open a ticket I guess. I dropped the {site.id: 1, lrt: -1} index and ran the query and it used the correct index. Rebuilt that index and ran the query again and it went right back to using the improper index again. –  kmfk Sep 26 '12 at 15:58
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