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What would be a good way to call the Execute method in batches of rulesObjs? Lets say the list have more than 10,000 objects and I want to call Execute with no more than 500 at a time.

    public static List<object> ExecutePolicy()
    {
        Policy policy = new Policy();

        List<object> rules = GetRules();

        object[] rulesObjs = rules.ToArray();

        // Call this method with array of object, but in batches.
        policy.Execute(rulesObjs);

        return rulesObjs.ToList();
    }

    private static List<object> GetRules()
    {
        // get the rules via some process
        return new List<object>();
    }
}

public sealed class Policy
{
    public void Execute(params object[] rules)
    {
        // Process rules...
    }
}

I do not have control over Execute() method.

share|improve this question
1  
I think you can use morelinq's Batch for this. – L.B Sep 24 '12 at 17:06
1  
L.B's suggestion would be that much more useful if GetRules returned an IEnumerable, rather than a list, and streamed its results rather than eagerly evaluating the whole thing. – Servy Sep 24 '12 at 17:13
    
@Servy I said it not performance wise, just for cleaner code. And it is not worse than calling the GetEnumerator in the loop for Skips and Takes – L.B Sep 24 '12 at 17:23
1  
@L.B Agreed. The two options are more or less the same when called on a List. If you already have MoreLinq in your solution then I would use Batch, if you don't then Skip and Take would be quicker/easier for me. If the source was streamed, then MoreLinq's Batch would be significantly better than skip/take. – Servy Sep 24 '12 at 17:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted
List<object> rules = GetRules();
int batchSize = 500;
int currentBatch = 0;

while (currentBatch * batchSize < rules.Count)
{
    object[] nextBatch = rules.Skip(currentBatch * batchSize)
        .Take(batchSize).ToArray();
    //use batch
    currentBatch++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 : One issue with this is if rules.Count % batchSize is not 0, it will throw an exception on .Take(batchSize) – VoodooChild Sep 24 '12 at 17:24
    
@VoodooChild No it wont. Take is implemented such that if you try to take more items than the collection has it will simply return all of the items that are there. – Servy Sep 24 '12 at 17:26
    
That's awesome, I did not know that - thanks. – VoodooChild Sep 24 '12 at 17:28
    
Skip is also implemented such that if you try to skip more items than the collection has it will simply return an empty enumerable, although I've written the code such that it shouldn't ever happen here. – Servy Sep 24 '12 at 17:30

Well, if you have control over the Execute() method, the best way to do it would be to pass an index to that method so that it knows at which index of the array to start at.

public void Execute(int startIndex, /*optional*/ int endIndex, params object[] rules)
{
    // Process rules...
}

Don't worry about passing too much data at once. Behind the scenes, your array is just a pointer, so you're only passing a reference anyways.


If you don't have control over the Execute() method, then you can make a new array for your section, using Array.Copy, and process that new array.

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I do not have control over Execute() method, updated my question to point it out. – VoodooChild Sep 24 '12 at 17:16

With a reference to System.Linq you can use skip and take:

int total = 10000;
int chunkSize = 500;
for (int i = 0; i < total; i += chunkSize )
{
    var chunk = rulesObjs.Skip(i).Take(chunkSize).ToArray();

    policy.Execute(chunk);
}
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